Destination Des Moines and the Waterland Festival & Parade are proud to announce the 2017 Waterland Grand Marshal – Fran Woodard.

Fran Woodard is a dedicated volunteer and active steward of the Waterland Festival & Parade. Her 33 year commitment to the City of Des Moines goes back to her term as the Executive Director of the Des Moines Chamber of Commerce and Director of the Waterland Festival.

In 2016 Fran was honored by the Seattle SeaFair Commodores in recognition of her service to the Waterland Festival as a SeaFair Sanctioned Community event. Destination Des Moines continues to draw on her experience as our beloved historian of the Waterland Festival.

You can see Fran’s lovely “parade wave” at the Waterland Parade, which starts at 6 p.m. this Saturday, July 22 at the Landmark and runs along Marine View Drive from South to North, ending at 216th.

On July 6, 2017, we emailed out a list of 10 Questions to all candidates running for Des Moines City Council in the Primary election, which has an Aug. 1 voting deadline.

This is the final post in our series for the 2017 Primary Election.

Of the two candidates running for Position #7, both responded, and here are their answers – published exactly as they sent them – and listed in alphabetical order:

CHAD HARPER

1. How long have you lived in Des Moines and why did you decide to live here?
I have been a resident of Des Moines for nearly 5 years. I chose to live in Des Moines because of its charm, the great people, and the fact that it’s a decent commuting distance from Seattle while still being relatively affordable.

2. What are your primary reasons for seeking election to the Des Moines City Council?
I am running because it’s time for a new voice with a fresh perspective to change the status quo in our city. Des Moines is a city with a lot of potential, and I’m excited to help our community be the best it can be. I’m proud my record of delivering results in our city as a member of the Human Services Commission, Trustee on the Highline Schools Foundation, and leader of last year’s successful school bond effort. For more information, visit my website: ChadforCouncil.org

3. What do you expect to gain personally from serving in a Council position?
I expect to confront new and exciting challenges and to work with a diverse group of colleagues to address our cities most pressing issues.

4. How should Des Moines react to the Port of Seattle’s proposed large and rapid expansion to Sea-Tac Airport and the increased noise and air pollution some say it will produce over the city?
Reducing noise pollution should be a top priority for all members of the city council. As someone who lives right under the flight path, I have first-hand experience with the increase in noise from planes leaving and entering SeaTac Airport. It’s clear we need to site an additional airport in our state. We can’t stop the growth of air travel and our region, but we can hold the FAA and the Port of Seattle accountable for the impacts the noise has on our community. I’m very supportive of the City of Burien’s efforts to sue the FAA to require them to complete an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS).

5. Do you consider the Marina seawall repair or replacement as a major financial problem facing the city and if not, what is the city’s biggest financial problem?
Repairing the seawall is a challenge, but not the biggest one. The city’s biggest financial problem is finding new revenue to increase the number of police officers in our community to combat increased crime. I’m proud that my commitment to public safety has earned me the distinction of being the only candidate in my race supported by law enforcement.

6. Do you believe paid Marina parking is the best way to finance the huge cost of the repair or replacement of the rapidly deteriorating seawall?
While unpopular, paid Marina is probably the best way to finance the seawall repair. If other solutions are proposed from councilmembers or members of the public, I am happy to consider those.

7. What are your views on further development for downtown Des Moines, the Marina, and the city’s partnership with the Port of Seattle at the Des Moines Creek Business Park?
Creating an environment where businesses can thrive in Des Moines is one of my top priorities. Our marina should be redeveloped with a commercial focus and in such a way that it connects with our downtown business. Our Marina and position along the Puget Sound puts us in a prime position to truly be a destination city. The Des Moines Creek Business Park will create thousands of new job which means more revenue for our city, and I’m very excited to see this development in our community.

8. Do you believe the Des Moines Police Department is doing a good job controlling crime in the city and, if not, what proposals for change would you recommend the Council adopt?
Des Moines has an excellent police department that is doing the best it can, given its current capacity. With new police officers, we can better address crime in the Pac Ridge area, Woodmont, and Redondo neighborhoods.

9. How would you propose Des Moines control increased card room gambling and marijuana sales along Pacific Highway South?
The voters of WA (including myself) voted to legalize marijuana at the ballot box. We can’t stop the sale of marijuana, but we could tax it. Other candidates have suggested this as a way of raising approximately $500,000 of revenue. I would vote in support of this. With that new revenue, we could better enforce local gambling laws.

10. What is your view of the way the city now budgets and spends its money and where would you cut or increase spending?
The city needs to budget based on reliable revenue, not wishful thinking. We need to return to being responsible stewards of taxpayers’ money. I would also like to see an increase in human services funding. I’m proud to serve on the Human Services Commission for our city and see the needs of our fellow residents. Our city’s demographics have changed as more people of modest means leave Seattle and move southward.

MATT MAHONEY

1. How long have you lived in Des Moines and why did you decide to live here?
My wife Bev and I have lived here 3 and ½ years. I grew up in Puyallup and have fond memories of spending time on the beach at Redondo during my childhood. Years ago, as an avid scuba diver, I became reacquainted with Des Moines and soon thereafter introduced Bev to the area. We both loved Des Moines and knew one day we wanted to live here. So after raising our children in Maple Valley, we sold our home with the intention of purchasing a condo at the Marina. We ended up doing a remodel on a property on North Hill and during that process found a community we could call home.

2. What are your primary reasons for seeking election to the Des Moines City Council?

  • I love the city and the people of Des Moines and want to give back to the community I’m vested in.
  • To help guide and facilitate the goals of Des Moines; Development, Business, Marina, Public Safety, Financial Sustainability, Airport Concerns
  • To ensure the city maintains a focus on our businesses and residents.
  • To be a voice for the residents of all neighborhoods to create one Des Moines.

3. What do you expect to gain personally from serving in a Council position?
The personal satisfaction that I am making a difference in the Des Moines community. Meeting and getting to know more the residents of the city.

4. How should Des Moines react to the Port of Seattle’s proposed large and rapid expansion to Sea-Tac Airport and the increased noise and air pollution some say it will produce over the city?
The city should address this issue in short and long term goals:

Short Term:

  • Partner with the surrounding cities and join efforts to represent concerns with the airport. Enlist our state and federal elected officials to be part of the process.
  • Encourage reduction of sulfur in fuels right now and switch to bio fuels.
  • Engage in efforts to cap flights and ensure quiet periods are established between midnight and 5 am.
  • Create a dialog with Port of Seattle and FAA Leadership to gain influence, build relationships and bring resolution of the impacts and concerns of our residents.

Long term:

  • 2nd Airport, 2nd Airport, 2nd Airport.
  • Strongly urge our state and federal representatives to support the concerns of communities located around airports with enforceable legislation to regulate operations.
  • Support the studies and monitoring of ultra-fine particles, noise and health issues associated with airports. Ensure state and federal leaders understand the impacts and what options are available to our residents.
  • Continue to find ways to protect our city and environment from impacts of the airport, i.e. tree management plan, quiet times, reduction of pollutants.
  • Push for Port Commission Districts so cities near airport have representation.
  • Insist FAA and Port of Seattle have a legitimate public forum process for open lines of communication to address concerns.
  • Request the Port financially compensate communities around the airport by supporting infrastructure and community projects.

5. Do you consider the Marina seawall repair or replacement as a major financial problem facing the city and if not, what is the city’s biggest financial problem?
Yes, I do! The seawall is estimated to be an 8 to 12-million-dollar repair/replacement and will be a major financial challenge. It is imperative those repairs be made sooner than later if we wish to ensure the Marina’s longevity. Lobbying for State, Federal, Developer and Port dollars in conjunction with bonds will be imperative.

The city budget has finally become sustainable but needs to be more than that. So I see another financial challenge as the need to support the city as it grows. The need to drive forward, development and business growth, while tying the Marina to a denser populated downtown is essential. While simultaneously creating a healthy commercial zone on Pacific Highway. The end game will be a sustainable and honest revenue source to support the city services our residents require long term.

6. Do you believe paid Marina parking is the best way to finance the huge cost of the repair or replacement of the rapidly deteriorating seawall?
I believe it’s a good start. When nearly 80% of visitors are not residents, when passes are offered at very reasonable prices for Des Moines residents and other frequent visitors, when the paid parking will curb misconduct and institute controls during off hours to lessen the burden on our law enforcement officers, when it will fund the interest on bonds to complete some of the work on the North Seawall, when no property taxes fund the marina, I see it as very helpful. I believe lobbying the Federal, State and Port for additional funding will be necessary. Possible funding from investors in development on the marina is an option too. Always willing to hear more ideas.

7. What are your views on further development for downtown Des Moines, the Marina, and the city’s partnership with the Port of Seattle at the Des Moines Creek Business Park?
We need it! I support it! We need sustainable revenue sources and population density to support our city operations, places to provide the businesses our residents want (i.e. grocery store) and ensure our future. I believe we have tremendous assets here and can use our waterside advantages to ensure sustainable revenue to support and improve our city. Tying the Marina to the downtown will be key in making a destination town and a place our residents can enjoy. A healthy business park and business zone on Pacific Highway will provide major benefits to help the city by generating additional revenue streams. However, all must be done effectively and compassionately while honoring the concerns of our residents. We don’t want development just to have development, it must be done wisely and intelligently.

8. Do you believe the Des Moines Police Department is doing a good job controlling crime in the city and, if not, what proposals for change would you recommend the Council adopt?
In general, our law enforcement professionals do a great job with the resources they have. The city council has found ways to hire more officers and purchase equipment/software our law enforcement professionals need despite financial constraints. However, the situation is more difficult than simply controlling crime. On occasion, I have spoken at City Hall meetings that more needs to be done. I do support more officers when we have the funds to do so. But I also believe an opportunity lies in employing our residents and/or neighbors to be watchful and active participants in crime prevention; so providing programs and tools that educate residents on what to look for, a comprehensive website providing info on crime trends for awareness and ease in reporting, and a block watch effort that covers every neighborhood are a good next step.

9. How would you propose Des Moines control increased card room gambling and marijuana sales along Pacific Highway South?
Communication with these businesses is and will be essential. We cannot turn a blind eye to this issue. The city is zoned for another marijuana store south of the Kent-Des Moines Highway. From what I understand, other card rooms under the zoning can occur if they meet certain criteria. Both the Sheraton Four Point and Greenside Recreational have demonstrated efforts to clean up and reduce crime on their portions of Pacific Highway. Our police on multiple occasions have affirmed that fact. Also both are and will continue to be large contributors to the city revenue, with the Casino potentially contributing nearly one million dollars annually four years from now based on the graduated rate the city negotiated. I would use these two operations as the template that any other enterprise of this nature would be expected to model.

10. What is your view of the way the city now budgets and spends its money and where would you cut or increase spending?
I think the current City Council budgets very effectively and little to no excess is prevalent. I believe they have found a few additional creative ways to generate revenue to just support base level city operations. Amazing considering the city faced bankruptcy only 18 months ago.

I’ve attended the many public budget forums and reviews along with personally reviewing and analyzing our budget and I see no significant areas to cut without impacting and creating ripple effects to city and other services we all count on. I do see a need for more officers, infrastructure improvements and additional funding for parks and recreation but those can only be supported through revenue generated by healthy sustainable business growth and development.

WLB Real Estate Sponsor Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Northwest Real Estate will be holding two Open Houses this weekend, on both Saturday, July 22, and Sunday, July 23:

The first home is a lovely 6-bedroom, 2-story home in Normandy Park with Lot A Beach Rights:

Space for the whole family in Normandy Park!

Bright, elegant, custom home with 6 bed and 3 bath, sports court, and sauna. Inviting entry and spectacular light with skylights in vaulted ceilings.

Deck with forest view.

Yard with room for your garden and outdoor play.

Formal living and dining room, open kitchen with desk, dining nook, and pantry. Bonus rec rooms downstairs.

Three car garage with storage, additional off-street parking.

Lot A Beach Rights included.

4K internet available.

WHEN: Saturday, July 22: 1 p.m. – 4 p.m.

WHERE: 132 SW 208th Street, Normandy Park, WA 98166 (MAP, or see below)

INFO:

  • List Price: $760,000
  • MLS Number: 1157709
  • Bedrooms: 6
  • Bathrooms: 3.25
  • Year Built: 1979
  • Approximate House SqFt: 2,900 s.f.
  • Approximate Lot SqFt: 15,277 s.f.

Site Features:

  • Athletic Court
  • Cable TV
  • Deck
  • Fenced-Partially
  • Gas Available
  • High Speed Internet
  • Hot Tub/Spa, Patio

Here are photos (click images to see larger versions/slideshow):

Click here to see the full, detailed listing.


The next Open House – open Sunday, July 23 – is a cute 3-bedroom Rambler in University Place:

This cute University Place 3 BR, 1.75 BA rambler is nestled in a cozy cul-de-sac community thats close to freeway access, excellent schools, Chambers Bay and shopping.

The open concept layout features new flooring throughout, skylights, a newer roof and exterior paint.

The generous deck allows for a great entertaining space outdoors.

A low maintenance yard and fully fenced for furry family members complete this move-in ready home.

Don’t miss out this truly turn-key opportunity!

WHEN: Sunday, July 23: 12 p.m. – 3 p.m.

WHERE: 4704 73rd Av Ct W., University Place, WA 98466 (MAP, or see below)

INFO:

  • List Price: $265,000
  • MLS Number: 1157709
  • Bedrooms: 3
  • Bathrooms: 1.75
  • Year Built: 1984
  • Approximate House SqFt: 1,152 s.f.
  • Approximate Lot SqFt: 5,471 s.f.

Site Features:

  • Bath Off Master
  • Dble Pane/Strm Windw
  • Security System
  • Skylights
  • Vaulted Ceilings
  • Deck
  • Disabled Access
  • Fenced-Fully

Here are photos (click images to see larger versions/slideshow):

Click here to see the full, detailed listing.

Click here to view all of Berkshire Hathaway’s Open Houses, and click here to “Like” them on Facebook.

On July 6, 2017, we emailed out a list of 10 Questions to all candidates running for Des Moines City Council in the Primary election, which has an Aug. 1 voting deadline.

We will be posting additional responses from candidates who answered our inquiry, grouped by position numbers.

Of the three candidates running for Position #5, all responded, and here are their answers – published exactly as they sent them – and listed in alphabetical order:

TRACI BUXTON

1. How long have you lived in Des Moines and why did you decide to live here?
I have lived in Des Moines for 35 years.  I moved here as a newlywed, taking a job with my husband as on-site managers for a 60-unit residential property.

2. What are your primary reasons for seeking election to the Des Moines City Council?
I hope to help create and maintain a:

  1. Green:  environmentally accountable,
  2. Safe:  working not only to fight crime, but support those who are coming out of a challenged life,
  3. Destination community; a place where millenials want to stay and raise their families and also a place that people from all over our region desire to visit.  I desire more than just economic responsibility – I am excited to see our business corridors (Pacific Highway and Marine View Drive) actually thrive with fine eateries, charming shops and creative artisans.

3. What do you expect to gain personally from serving in a Council position?
I expect to gain the satisfaction of participating in an incredible network of people while living in a community I am proud of – – and along the way, I hope to gain wisdom.  Outside of that, I expect to personally expend more than I gain.

4. How should Des Moines react to the Port of Seattle’s proposed large and rapid expansion to Sea-Tac Airport and the increased noise and air pollution some say it will produce over the city?

Des Moines should:

  • Continue to stand resolute in our expectation of mitigation for environmental impacts,
  • Continue to demand that expansion cease until mitigation is satisfactory, and
  • Continue to support research which will give firm direction for our efforts.

5. Do you consider the Marina seawall repair or replacement as a major financial problem facing the city and if not, what is?
Our Marina is our finest asset and we would do well to take care of it.  Should we lose it, we lose our ability to move forward with revitalization of our City.  If the Marina seawall is in danger, so is the health of our City on many levels.  So, yes, this is a major financial problem facing our City.

6. Do you believe paid Marina parking is the best way to finance the huge cost of the repair or replacement of the rapidly deteriorating seawall?
The best way to finance the replacement would have been to save and plan ahead.  That was not made possible for several reasons.  Paid parking will work, and it will accomplish a few other issues at the same time, such as safety, both during the day and at night.  This will in turn, free our law enforcement team to attend to other areas of the City, helping to relieve many crime issues.

7. What are your views on further development for downtown Des Moines, the Marina, and the city’s partnership with the Port of Seattle at the Des Moines Creek Business Park?
Tongue-in-cheek, I like to say that I would love to create a parking problem in downtown Des Moines!  Evenings can produce a park-n-walk situation here and there, however, during the day I generally hope I don’t hit a tumbleweed 😉  We need daytime businesses, but we also need attractive places for them to put out their wares!

The advent of on-line shopping has brought many brick and mortar stores to their knees.  Downtown Des Moines will continue to struggle if we try to provide only what people need.  In order to become a destination, we need to provide an experience.  Our shops, artisans, restaurants, plazas and marina need to create a day’s worth of entertainment and accommodations for the whole family.  Visiting a destination town is not for fulfilling needs, but for creating memories.

Our partnership with the Port of  Seattle is only beginning with the Des Moines Creek Business Park.  The State of Washington has seen to it that it is the responsibility of all Ports to partner with their neighboring communities in economic stimulation, and the Port of Seattle is no exception.  The City of Des Moines will continue to expect not only mitigation from the Port for environmental impacts, but partnership in growing our local economy.

8. Do you believe the Des Moines Police Department is doing a good job controlling crime in the city and, if not, what proposals for change would you recommend the Council adopt?
I believe that not only are the police making huge strides in fighting crime, but they are working effectively as a team with other arms of the City in order to mitigate in high crime neighborhoods, through projects such as property clearing and holding negligent landlords accountable.

In addition, Chief Delgado and team have worked hard to connect with citizens through programs like Coffee with a Cop, Block Watch and also networking with private, residential cameras in order to apprehend offenders more effectively.

9. How would you propose Des Moines control increased card room gambling and marijuana sales along Pacific Highway South?
Currently, our two locations are lucrative sources of revenue, which is coming from upscale and/or clean and attractive venues.  However, if needed, there are zoning options that can sometimes be employed in order to limit questionable or undesirable activity near churches, schools and essential public facilities.

10. What is your view of the way the city now budgets and spends its money and where would you cut or increase spending?
Our City is just coming out on the other side of a major recession.  We are coming into the black with a sustainable budget for the first time in years.  This is an incredible accomplishment and I am proud of our current leadership.  Rather than cut spending, I think time spent in increasing revenue through stimulating a healthier economy would be the wisest way to a more robust budget.  In addition, rather than increase spending additional revenues, I would prefer to build reserves for a while in order to create a hedge against high cost capital improvements or repairs, such as the Marina seawall.

PATRICIO MENDOZA

1. How long have you lived in Des Moines and why did you decide to live here?
Patricio Mendoza is been living in Des Moines for over 25 years. I came to help out with my niece. It wasn’t long before I met my wife, Rachelle, and we knew that Des Moines was the place we wanted to live and raise our family.

2. What are your primary reasons for seeking election to the Des Moines City Council?
I believe that everyone on the City Council tries to do the best job that they can. Each member has a particular skill that allows them to provide a benefit for the community. I believe I have skills, with the cooperation of the other council members, to make the City more vital, financially sustainable, and create innovation to enable business success. I love this city and want to see it continue to grow and thrive. Business development and community safety are my top priorities.

3. What do you expect to gain personally from serving in a Council position?
I am not running for personal recognition, so I don’t even think about personal gain. I have been serving the community for the almost past three decades and I am in a position now that I believe will benefit the community even more if I am on the City Council.

4. How should Des Moines react to the Port of Seattle’s proposed large and rapid expansion to Sea-Tac Airport and the increased noise and air pollution some say it will produce over the city?
I believe that the first step is going in the right direction. The creation of a committee to work with Quiet Skies is a good start. We need to work more quickly. Things have been moving too slowly. I understand that today we have a good relationship with the Port of Seattle and especially with SeaTac Airport, but we also need to work toward a resolution, not just complain. The solution we need to work for will be found by maintaining the good relationships we have already built and making sure that the needs of the community are met by listening to their concerns.

5. Do you consider the Marina seawall repair or replacement as a major financial problem facing the city and if not, what is the city’s biggest financial problem?
I believe the Marina Seawall needs to be replaced, but I don’t believe it is the biggest financial issue we face. That is the city’s inability to hire enough police officers to keep its citizens and visitors safe. I believe strongly that we need to make the citizens feel safe. We can fix the seawall or repair any street, but if we don’t feel safe, it makes no difference,

6. Do you believe paid Marina parking is the best way to finance the huge cost of the repair or replacement of the rapidly deteriorating seawall?
I understand the Paid Parking is going to the overall financial budget so it is not financing repair or replacement of the Marina Seawall. Developing businesses at and around the Marina, the best asset we have in Des Moines, is a better way to finance it. In my opinion, paid parking is keeping people out when we should be working on ways to invite people in.

7. What are your views on further development for downtown Des Moines, the Marina, and the city’s partnership with the Port of Seattle at the Des Moines Creek Business Park?
I would like to see all the empty stores be developed. I would like to see Downtown and the Marina really be one connected to each other to make it easier for people to enjoy the shopping, dining, entertainment, and cultural offerings in Des Moines. As far as the partnership is concerned, I believe there is a fine line between that relation and I would like to get more information about the details of that agreement.

8. Do you believe the Des Moines Police Department is doing a good job controlling crime in the city and, if not, what proposals for change would you recommend the Council adopt?
I believe the Police are doing the best they can do with the resources we have. We can do better. We need to work with the surrounding communities; Federal Way, Burien, Normandy Park, Kent, Auburn, Tacoma, and Renton, to build a comprehensive plan to combat criminal activity in our region. Only through this regional cooperation will we begin to see real changes in community safety.

9. How would you propose Des Moines control increased card room gambling and marijuana sales along Pacific Highway South?
I think Des Moines has enough of each. There are certain distractions elements that are attracted to each of these types of businesses which put a strain on our already limited resources. To those who would say that these businesses bring in much needed tax revenue I say that I am not for sale and Des Moines is not for sale. I am not willing to sell the integrity and values of Des Moines to pad the budget.

10. What is your view of the way the city now budgets and spends its money and where would you cut or increase spending?
I believe the City Council is doing a good job with the budget because we have one. The economy has been getting better and the city benefits from that as well . I don’t believe in big government so I will have to look at that area, but I believe technology and security have to work together to make a safe community.

HARRY STEINMETZ

1. How long have you lived in Des Moines and why did you decide to live here?
I have lived in Des Moines for 18 years. When my wife and I found out she was pregnant, we begin looking for a house. I was working in Olympia and she was working on Queen Anne Hill, so Des Moines was a good halfway point in terms of our commutes.We liked being near the water and the marina. We were impressed that the city had one of the highest ratios of police in to population in the state and healthy parks and recreation program. After brunch at Salty’s one Sunday morning, we were driving around looking at houses. My brother, who was visiting from out of town, saw the sign for an open house, but it appeared to be too close to the water to be affordable, We discovered a big yard with an old house and put an offer in on it. Fortunately, the seller, who had raised her family there liked us and accepted our offer, with the caveat that we had to agree to host the neighborhood barbecue every summer as she had done. We have lived the ever since and have some to the greatest neighbors in the world. The previous owner attended the barbecue for the next 5 years.

2. What are your primary reasons for seeking election to the Des Moines City Council?
I am running for the Des Moines City Council to assure the development of the Downtown happens in conjunction with the development of the marina. We need a strong business district that provided a steady tax base for our city. Des Moines needs to become a more business friendly city and needs an active Chamber of Commerce. Secondly, we need to make sure the city budgets based on sustainable revenues and not on hopes for revenue or one-time funds. Additionally, we need to have better representation of neighborhoods on the council. I live in the south end to town and there is no one on the council that can pay attention to what is happening in Zenith, Woodmont or the Redondo neighborhoods. Lastly, I believe we need a more transparent and inclusive approach to governing the city. Not enough effort is made to reach out to the various communities in Des Moines to get their input into the issues that face the city. We need a better communication plan for the city and we need a more inclusive dialogue.

3. What do you expect to gain personally from serving in a Council position?
I hope to gain a sense of satisfaction that I did all I could to make our city a better place to live for everyone.

4. How should Des Moines react to the Port of Seattle’s proposed large and rapid expansion to Sea-Tac Airport and the increased noise and air pollution some say it will produce over the city?
Des Moines needs to work with the surrounding cities, King County and the State to mitigate the impact of the expansion of the airport. We need to encourage citizens groups like Quite Skies Puget Sound in include their expertise, research and organization into a supportive organization. In the long run, the biggest priority need to be the another airport, both for passenger and freight. In the short run, we need to limit the number of flights and the height of the planes to mitigate against the noise pollution.

5. Do you consider the Marina seawall repair or replacement as a major financial problem facing the city and if not, what is the city’s biggest financial problem?
The city’s biggest financial problem is the long term fiscal health of the city. For the first time in recent memory, the council passed a budget based on sustainable revenue. Secondly, we need to develop a sustainable reserve fund to deal with large financial issue such as the needed repairs to the seawall. Depending on the urgency of repairing the seawall, plan A should be to pay of the repairs out of the ongoing revenues. Additionally, we should look at the emergency preparedness planning, to see if Des Moines as a back up to existing facilities, can access any federal or state funds to contribute to the needed repairs. Plan B would be to use the city’s bonding authority to pay for the repairs. The city currently has 2 bonds that will be retired in the next 5 years, so I believe we have the capacity, if needed.

6. Do you believe paid Marina parking is the best way to finance the huge cost of the repair or replacement of the rapidly deteriorating seawall?
Since we have no idea, at this point, how much the Marina Parking will generate, it makes little sense to assume it alone can finance the cost to the repair to the seawall.

7. What are your views on further development for downtown Des Moines, the Marina, and the city’s partnership with the Port of Seattle at the Des Moines Creek Business Park?
I strongly believe the downtown area should be developed in conjunction with Marina and not separately. If, as some have suggested, we build a large retail and restaurant development in the Marina, the incentives will not be there for boaters to leave the Marina and explore downtown. There needs to be a connection between downtown and the Marina that will work for both.
The City’s partnership with the Port is a good deal for the City in terms of developing new revenue streams. Not much has been said about what the Port is getting out of this partnership and the City should be more transparent about the implications.

8. Do you believe the Des Moines Police Department is doing a good job controlling crime in the city and, if not, what proposals for change would you recommend the Council adopt?
Given the resources they have had to work with, the Des Moines Police Department has been doing a good job. The problem is that we need more police to deal with the issues we are facing and we are told dependent on neighboring cities for back up and larger police actions.

9. How would you propose Des Moines control increased card room gambling and marijuana sales along Pacific Highway South?
The city has enormous controls over the location of marijuana sales. The current marijuana shop has been run with such a high level of security that the immediate area around it has seen a significant decrease in crime. This is a good model to follow. Card room are a slightly different story. However, the City can use it’s taxing authority to limit the market for card rooms and its zoning laws to control their location.

10. What is your view of the way the city now budgets and spends its money and where would you cut or increase spending?
After many years, the City finally passed a budget based on sustainable revenue. As a council member, I will insist that we continue this process. One year is not enough. The City has also just switched to a new way of presenting the budget that seems much more clear and easier to follow. The City has a number of financial issue that will need to be addressed over the coming years. The priority needs to be public safety and quality of life issues for all citizens of our city.

The beautiful sunny days just keep coming at the Des Moines Waterfront Farmers Market!

It is so nice to see new fruits and vegetables ripening and on display. We are expecting another record day for the Waterland Festival weekend beginning Friday and running thru Sunday. Also, keep in mind we will validate 2 hours free parking for both Sat. & Wed. markets. Just show your purchases at the market info booth. If you are a Des Moines resident and have a vehicle registered in Des Moines, you can get a yearly ($30) pass at the Marina office for $15 for the rest of this year.

Bargain hunters break open your piggy banks, as this coming Saturday is another Clutter 2 Cash event where you can find great values, especially those of you hunting for specialty items of all kinds and almost new first run books. Look for the sale in the horseshoe parking lot in front of the Marina office. There still are a few spaces left. If you feel the urge to raise some extra cash, call this number 206-824-1066 to reserve your space. The cost is $20. The next and last sale of the season will be August 19th.

The Des Moines Police Foundation is holding it’s annual bake sale. This year’s proceeds will go to refund the Steve J. Underwood memorial scholarship through dollars for scholars.  The memorial scholarship is at risk for being discontinued due to lack of funding.  Please stop by the Foundations booth Saturday and help keep Steve’s legacy alive.

Cory Clark, founder and Head Jerk behind Soda Jerk Soda, started his company to meet a need for a better tasting, environmentally friendly soda, made from the finest ingredients possible. He spent months developing recipes, refining processes, sourcing ingredients, and tasting sodas. The results of all that hard work is the unique, tasty refreshments he offers today. He also strives to create a healthier soda using real fruit, natural ingredients, and real organic cane sugar instead of corn syrup. He also has growlers to go of your favorite soda for your party or for making cocktails at home.

Food Trucks: Athena’s, Chick’n Fix,  & NOSH

Music: Bob Spark

Community Groups: WIC, MaST, DMPFD, Friends of the Library and Van 2 go

Visit market sponsor Wesley Homes booth to learn about their not-for-profit organization. They have been home to generations of Northwest families since 1944. Today, they serve residents in Des Moines & Auburn as well as home health clients in King and Pierce counties.

Be sure to check to see if you qualify for our healthy eating initiative for low income families called Fresh Bucks, Come to the market, swipe your EBT card and it will double your dollars (up to $10) per person. This program is good for all market days (Sat & Wed).

The Rotary Club of Des Moines and Normandy Park has a booth every Saturday to promote the Annual Poverty Bay Blues and Brews Festival. The festival this year is on August 26th at the Beach Park. At their booth you can buy your discount tickets in advance ($35, $40 at the event). Also get your raffle tickets for $5 for the grand prize, a Mariners luxury box suite at Safeco Field in early September. The package includes 23 tickets, $800 for catered food, 6 VIP parking passes and allows access to the Terrace Club lounges. There is a runner up prize of two season passes to Centerstage Theatre.  Last but not the least; you can enter to win $100 by texting the word Rotary to 555888.  You will receive a text with a link to your entry form.  Fill out the entry form and you are automatically entered to win. Text and data rates may apply. The proceeds benefit the Highline Music 4 Life program which puts instruments in the hands of kids who otherwise might not be able to have them.

Don’t forget the Des Moines Area Food Bank “Picnic in the Park” free summer lunch program for all school age kids. Look for them in the grassy area next to the marina office. And if you can’t wait until noon, they will serve free snacks from 10 to 11:30am and lunch from 11:30 to 1pm.  A child does not need to be a Highline Public School student to participate. They will be there every Saturday until school starts. Don’t forget in July & August the Sunset Market free summer dinner program will be serving snacks from 3:45 to 4:30pm and dinner from 4:30 to 6:30pm.  If you would like to volunteer to help with this program, contact the Food Bank 206-878-2660.

Seniors don’t forget that the market and the King Conservation District, with partner Sound Generations, are offering the HYDE Shuttle providing local door to door transportation to and from the market to seniors 55 and older and people with disabilities of all ages living in Des Moines, Normandy Park, Burien and Sea-Tac. Call 206-727-6262 to schedule a ride. The rides are every other week: July 29; August 12,26; September 9,23.

Be sure to get your application for the upcoming and last Clutter to Cash sale for August 19th.  You can sell all that odd ball stuff you have been moving from one side of your garage to the other. The booth spaces are starting to fill up, so we are encouraging people to sign up early. The space fee is $20 and you must provide your own tables, chairs, etc. You can sign up at the information booth or download the application from our web site.

Upcoming Events

To keep up with all the special events, featuring what’s fresh and entertainment at the market, please log onto the web site and this weekly column. You can also keep up on the activities by visiting the market’s Facebook page. We have discontinued the e-newsletter.

Thanks to our sponsors:

The market takes place in the north Des Moines Marina parking lot, at 22307 Dock Ave S.:

On July 6, 2017, we emailed out a list of 10 Questions to all candidates running for Des Moines City Council in the Primary election, which has an Aug. 1 voting deadline.

We will be posting additional responses from candidates who answered our inquiry, grouped by position numbers.

Of the two candidates running for Position #3, both responded, and here are their answers – published exactly as they sent them – and listed in alphabetical order:

JC HARRIS

1. How long have you lived in Des Moines and why did you decide to live here?
I bought a home in Des Moines in 2005. At the time I was already a member of St. Philomena and had been sailing and fishing in the area for ten years. I was always impressed by the many well-kept gardens near Marine View Drive—a hobby I also enjoy very much. So when I started my search for a house, that’s where I started looking.

2. What are your primary reasons for seeking election to the Des Moines City Council?
I would like to help the city to refocus much more on the Downtown and improving the quality of life for the new generation of families moving into the area.

3. What do you expect to gain personally from serving in a Council position?
It would make me feel great to be able to make a positive difference for the future of Des Moines, a city that has given me so much.

4. How should Des Moines react to the Port of Seattle’s proposed large and rapid expansion to Sea-Tac Airport and the increased noise and air pollution some say it will produce over the city?
We should actively oppose Port expansion. The amount of noise and pollution is already far too high.

5. Do you consider the Marina seawall repair or replacement as a major financial problem facing the city and if not, what is the city’s biggest financial problem?
I would characterize the seawall an essential investment in our future. The Marina is our great gift and as we are the stewards of this place it is our obligation to properly care for it. Our biggest financial ‘problem’ over time will be the airport. Left unchecked, the airport will have a negative impact on everything in Des Moines. Therefore we must find a way to manage and if possible, reverse its effects to our people, property and business. That too is our duty as stewards.

6. Do you believe paid Marina parking is the best way to finance the huge cost of the repair or replacement of the rapidly deteriorating seawall?
It may be necessary—but only in the short term. Paid parking should not be made a permanent feature of the Marina.

7. What are your views on further development for downtown Des Moines, the Marina, and the city’s partnership with the Port of Seattle at the Des Moines Creek Business Park?
Making the Downtown a destination for visitors and families should be the top priority of the city. We should create a committee comprised of urban planning professionals, knowledgeable citizens and business leaders to come up with a long-term vision that will make Downtown Des Moines a compelling destination for generations to come.
The Marina needs to be properly maintained as it is Des Moines. It is the magnet that has always, and will always, draw people to this place.

While I acknowledge the short term financial incentives, I am somewhat skeptical of the long term benefits of the Des Moines Creek Business Park. Frankly, the challenges the airport now pose to our community, in terms of health, noise and dollars make such partnerships very hard to justify.

8. Do you believe the Des Moines Police Department is doing a good job controlling crime in the city and, if not, what proposals for change would you recommend the Council adopt?
In general, yes. However the city should also enact code enforcement ordinances similar to other communities so that properties are kept up better. We have had too many unkempt areas, nuisance issues and related crimes. Also, the city can invest in low cost Parks and Recreation programs which have been shown to significantly reduce crime without requiring more officers.

9. How would you propose Des Moines control increased card room gambling and marijuana sales along Pacific Highway South?
I am not in favor of further expansion of either of these types of businesses in Des Moines and we should exercise our zoning authority to limit these as much as is practical. I am open to exploring the creation of a city tax on the sale of marijuana.

10. What is your view of the way the city now budgets and spends its money and where would you cut or increase spending?
Budgets are tight, so we need to focus on what provides the best value for money. I would like to improve the city’s information management systems; the web site, newsletters, TV and communications. Government should always try to be transparent, accessible and accountable. Often the city has not scored well as to how it informs the public about upcoming events. Often it can be difficult to interact with the city. And often it is difficult to find information in various archives. If we improve in these areas, it opens up government to much greater participation.

We also need to invest a little more in Parks and Recreation. Des Moines has a growing number of families and children and their importance to our future should be reflected in our city’s budget.

VIC PENINGTON

1. How long have you lived in Des Moines and why did you decide to live here?
I have lived in Des Moines Fifty (50) years; I came here with my parents as a child, as an adult I went to work at the local fire department and decided to live, work and raise my family in Des Moines. We have an incredible jewel of a city with great sense of community.

2. What are your primary reasons for seeking election to the Des Moines City Council?
This council has been through a lot during the last four years. The direction of the city has changed from rapidly moving toward bankruptcy to a stable and sustainable city. This took the establishment of partnerships, community group engagement along with hard work and focus. I used my skillsets developed serving as a Water District Commissioner and through my 43 years as a Firefighter and Assistant Fire Chief; working with other council members and city administration we have created the foundation for a long-term viability and city independence while maintaining the positive and livable waterfront community we all value.

This level of work must continue, I’m running for a second term to continue the vitally important work of bringing our city back to sustainable and long-term health. Building now so future councils, city leaders and citizens will not be in the same difficult situation.

As we continue our mission I will focus on updating ordinances and zoning while evaluating opportunities that will create both a sustainable future and reduce the financial weight on the city’s residents. To do this effectively we’ve had and will continue to have many conversations with the community, local businesses, property owners, real estate brokers, government representatives, continuing to listen and learn. The result is updated zoning and building codes making it easier and more cost effective for businesses, property owners and citizens to maintain and update their investments.

3. What do you expect to gain personally from serving in a Council position?
I have lived in Des Moines Fifty (50) years; I have raised my family in this wonderful city. By being reelected to City Council gives me the opportunity to continue to contribute to the well-being and health of this City, to work to enhance quality of life for all our residents. This level of work must continue, I’m running for a second term to continue the vitally important work of bringing our city back to sustainable and long-term health. It gives me a chance to give back to our community and to assure that future councils, city leaders and citizens will not be in the same difficult situation that I inherited in 2013; and that future generations have the opportunities and positive experiences in Des Moines that I have been so fortunate to receive growing up and living here.

4. How should Des Moines react to the Port of Seattle’s proposed large and rapid expansion to Sea- Tac Airport and the increased noise and air pollution some say it will produce over the city?
I voted for the City to move forward to create an Aviation Advisory Committee. We have worked actively to defend our City from the adverse impacts of Sea-Tac airport expansion. I was working and living in the in Des Moines during the Third Runway fight; I now am in a role that can influence and fight for the Port of Seattle to address the noise, frequency of flights and health impacts they are now creating with their proposed expansion. I am proud to have been able to help facilitate a meeting between “Quiet Skies Des Moines” and City of Des Moines leadership. This was a very productive meeting that opened communication and provided guidance as to roles of Quiet Skies Des Moines and city leadership.

5. Do you consider the Marina seawall repair or replacement as a major financial problem facing the city and if not, what is the city’s biggest financial problem?
The utmost financial challenge that Des Moines is facing is continued financial sustainable assuring the continued existence of the City of Des Moines. The Marina seawall repair is a serious financial challenge that must be addressed sooner than later, we have taken several important actions to address the failing seawall. These steps include the implementation of paid parking; requesting financial support from the State Legislature, researching federal port security grants.
The Redondo Boardwalk was destroyed during a violent storm. As a council, we faced a $4 million plus repair and replacement cost. Members of the city staff and council leadership reached out to our county, state and federal partners to find funding for the repair and replacement of the Boardwalk.

The Boardwalk was repaired at a cost of over $4 million our city residents only paid about 10% of the cost. We are seeking that kind of multi-jurisdictional support to repair and replace the marina’s north seawall.

6. Do you believe paid Marina parking is the best way to finance the huge cost of the repair or replacement of the rapidly deteriorating seawall?
Paid parking in the Marina provides four very distinct benefits.

  1. Paid parking helps to provide the financial resource needed to repair the north seawall.
  2. Paid parking is a cost recovery tool; approximately 80% of the marina visitors live outside of our city, while the marina is a regional destination, the users that most enjoy the marina do not help pay for the ongoing cost of maintaining the facilities they use.
  3. Paid parking is a work force multiplier assisting law enforcement by prevent illegal and nuisance activities in the Marina North parking lot that have been occurring primarily at night. Reducing calls for service at the Marina allow our police patrol units to focus in other areas of the city providing greater police visibility in our neighborhoods.
  4. The North Marina area is a critical logistical and operational staging area for emergency management services. It provides a landing area for helicopters, as well as critical land and water access during a local or regional major emergency event.

7. What are your views on further development for downtown Des Moines, the Marina, and the city’s partnership with the Port of Seattle at the Des Moines Creek Business Park?
The value that is received from a partnership with the Port of Seattle is a win on several levels. This is an excellence three-way public/private partnership between the City of Des Moines, Port of Seattle and private developers of the Des Moines Creak Business Park. The Des Moines Creek Business Park will provide the demand to enhance the quality of our downtown, offer the economic engine to develop the Marina and provide tax revenues to support community quality of life services as well as other community desired and expected services.

8. Do you believe the Des Moines Police Department is doing a good job controlling crime in the city and, if not, what proposals for change would you recommend the Council adopt?
I am proud to work with the members of the Des Moines Police Department; I am the only city council member that works as a Professional Fire Fighter / Assistant Fire Chief in the streets of Des Moines and South King County. I bring a prospective of public safety awareness that I have been able to share with other members of the council providing them with a better firsthand understanding of the needs of the police department. I have directly found, influenced and fought for Public Safety Funding that brings our patrol teams back to full strength, filling detective positions, created a new detective position that is assigned to the regional Violent Crimes Task Force, created an Assistant Police Chief in charge of Operation allowing the Police Chief to focus on other critical needs. Working with city and police leadership to creating a Pacific Ridge Plan to address crime not only in that neighborhood but throughout all neighborhoods in the city. Our Police Department has always been and continues to be incredibly competent, the future focus should be on most efficient allocation of resources.

9. How would you propose Des Moines control increased card room gambling and marijuana sales along Pacific Highway South?
The current marijuana and gambling locations have been very responsible, complying with local and state laws, not creating any policing issues. The city council and city staff carefully considers any zoning and land uses that do or could provide for these types of activities.

10. What is your view of the way the city now budgets and spends its money and where would you cut or increase spending?
The goal must be long term and ongoing sustainability. Council leadership working with the City administration have reorganized functions in the city to maximize efficiency and reduce redundancies. We have increased revenues, safety and the long term financial sustainability by utilizing the following revenue streams; Red light photo enforcement (hiring police officers and creating safe route/ sidewalks to schools), Utility franchise fees (reinvesting in our in roads and other infrastructure), Marina paid parking (reinvesting in the marina and reducing illegal actives in the marina and beach park). The Business Park has brought in $600,000 of Real Estate Excise tax to date, that money can be used for primarily capital projects.

We have now met the Washington State Auditor’s Office for the appropriate reserve revenue amounts required for this city, for the first time in over 10 years we have created passed a budget with no one time moneys use to fill budget short fall; as was the practice of the past.

We still need to be very diligent relative to spending as we move forward, providing the community with desired and expected services. We must ensure there is not wasteful spending and that our new revenues become stable and consistent.

[EDITOR’S NOTE: The following is a Letter to the Editor, written by a Reader. It does not necessarily reflect the opinion of The Waterland Blog nor its staff:]

Mt. Rainier Pool is closed for renovations and when they reopen, the Metropolitan Pool District will self-manage. I would like to give a huge THANK YOU TO Aquatics Management Group (AMG), specifically Ken Spencer and Gene Achziger for their exemplary service to the users of Mt. Rainier pool and our Waterland community.

When King County dropped the pools in 2003 and turned the title over to a very reluctant City Council, AMG was formed to keep the pool open in very financially trying times. The recession of 2008 led to the formation of the Metropolitan Pool District in 2009 when the City and School District could no longer support the operation of the facility. AMG was instrumental in getting the district formed to save swimming in Des Moines.

Under Ken Spencer’s creative managership, AMG has provided a safe, positive community center for dozens of user groups including: Mt. Rainier High School Swim teams, various swim and dive clubs, synchronized swimming and water polo teams, SCUBA training, essential training for companies such as Alaska Airlines, Boeing, South King Fire and Rescue, local police Departments, Boy Scout troops, etc. Fitness classes, water exercise, lap swims and other programs kept our citizens of all ages healthy. And, of course, through the years, THOUSANDS of local children were taught not only water safety, but more importantly…how to SWIM safely.

Of course, these programs could be successful only because of the outstanding guards AMG has trained and employed through the years. Due to everyone’s diligence, every Health, Fire and Safety Audit was passed, and not one major incident occurred under these guard’s watchful eyes!

Several years ago, Gene Achziger (who spearheaded the Save The Pool campaign in 2008/9 and past president of the Metropolitan Pool District), was hired as community outreach coordinator. Gene has gone above and beyond providing and participating in events to non-conventional swim groups: The Pumpkin Plunge, Winter Wonderland, No School?Come to the Pool!, Farmers Market, Summer Concert Series, Zombie and Winter Fests, the Highline School Districts Back to School Fairs, and Many More. However, Gene didn’t stop there. He worked with area school’s PTSA’s to provide swim nights for their schools, and worked with Highline College to help diversify our pool for our rapidly changing demographics. Gene is also the man who procured a $25K grant from Kaiser Permanente which allowed us to resurrect the AquaGuard (Jr. Lifeguarding) program as well as provide middle school students who had an interest in lifeguarding to learn the swim skills needed to become one.

For 14 years, AMG has made Mt. Rainier a valued community resource for its citizens of all ages at a sustainable responsible cost. The Pool District has some very large “flippers” to fill and I look forward to them building on the foundation that AMG has created.

My heartfelt thanks,
Schell Ross
Teacher/24 year pool employee&volunteer/Past Pool District commissioner

[Have an opinion or concern you’d like to share with our engaged Readers? Please send us your Letter to the Editor via email. Include your full name, please remain civil, cite any sources, and, pending our review, we’ll consider publishing it.]

Five Highline College students are participating in the first Wesley Homes Students-in-Residence, multigenerational program.

“This is such a distinctive program,” said Wesley Homes Director of Sales and Community Relations Lynn Stapleton. “Students at Highline College are living on our Des Moines campus and interacting with residents by volunteering. It’s a win-win for both Highline and Wesley.”

Over the last few years, both Wesley Homes and Highline College entered into periods of transformation and needed housing solutions.

Wesley Homes Des Moines is in the midst of redeveloping the entire south side of its 42-acre campus to offer residents contemporary accommodations and amenities. This redevelopment occurs in phases over several years and will replace The Gardens, the five-story apartment building. Until then, vacancies are expected. Wesley Homes needed a solution to fill those short-term vacancies.

Highline College, now a four-year degree institution, needed student housing during a time when rental prices are continually rising. Plans are in place to build a dorm, but that housing is two to three years in the future.

After learning about a similar student program in the Netherlands and on the East Coast, Lynn and Wesley Homes Resident Services Administrator Lisa Meinecke began developing the details of a housing program with their team. They took their proposal to Highline College Director of Special Projects Charis Hnin.

“Highline was very enthusiastic about housing students in our apartments in The Gardens,” said Lynn, “and Wesley has been building strong intergenerational programs. This level of intergenerational engagement really shows our commitment to keeping our residents involved and supporting the greater community.”

“There’s a power to having a mixed population, a synergy that occurs,” said Lisa. “Residents get to hear first-hand what the younger generations think today. The students get to see that seniors are pretty cool. The program just fosters a greater understanding between generations.”

Dayne Post, one of the program’s inaugural students, would agree. “I didn’t know exactly how to relate to the residents,” said Post. “My dad told me to be open-minded, that this could be a great experience. I decided that education could be something that we have in common, so I help them with technology and photos. There’s a lot of curiosity about cloud data storage. It really is turning out to be a great experience. And I have a view of Puget Sound from my apartment. I’ve never had a view before.”

“I was afraid I wouldn’t like it, but I do,” said Robert Hill. “I live with the people I volunteer for. I’m being pushed out of my comfort zone, and that’s okay. I receive love and give love to the community. This opportunity is a godsend.”

Robert volunteers his time on campus consulting on technology, too.

“People need tech stuff,” said Robert. “They need help for their resident events. Sometimes they just need companionship with dominoes and puzzles. I can’t do puzzles at all, but these residents are amazing with puzzles.”

Though Highline College initially evaluates the students for the program, the rental agreement is between Wesley Homes and each student. In addition to paying $250 per month for their studio apartments, the students must be age 18 or over, currently enrolled at Highline College, pass a background check and tuberculin skin test by Wesley Homes and spend 10 hours a week volunteering with residents. Those hours can include meals in the dining rooms, technology time, off-campus outings, fitness classes and more. Students are not allowed to volunteer as administrative support. The students’ monthly fee includes private rooms with a microwave and a refrigerator, one meal per day, utilities, Wi-Fi, housekeeping twice a month, free parking, access to on-campus fitness centers and spas, a storage locker and other amenities.

Robert sees other advantages to participating in the program. “I can help pave the way for other students and be a template. I’m able to be involved in a community and see the direct result.”

The other participants to the program are Anthony Austin, Michaella Clemming and Shanique Dickens.

“I love the relationships that Wesley is building,” said Lisa. “We’re thinking outside the box by partnering with the Des Moines Activity Center and Highline College on Wesley U continuing education, with Highline School District on a Montessori Program and with the Millennium Kids Creative Center on a preschool program. We are working on solutions for the community.”

On July 6, 2017, we emailed out a list of 10 Questions to all candidates running for Des Moines City Council in the Primary election, which has an Aug. 1 voting deadline.

We will be posting additional responses from candidates who answered our inquiry, grouped by position numbers.

Of the three candidates running for Position #1, all responded, and here are their answers – published exactly as they sent them – and listed in alphabetical order using their photos from the King County Elections website:

CURTIS HARMON

1. How long have you lived in Des Moines and why did you decide to live here?
I have lived in the Des Moines Area for the last 10 years.

2. What are your primary reasons for seeking election to the Des Moines City Council?
My life was long ago dedicated to serving my fellow man and all my neighbors. Yet we all have different seasons in our lives where, over time, we focus on different types of service. During our season as parents we serve our children. In our working careers we serve customers and our employers. We also have an individual responsibility to serve the sick and poor among us. Currently I see a city that is struggling financially and I feel a strong obligation to serve my community by restoring it to a sound economic footing. Now is the time and season in my life to serve the good people of Des Moines as a City Council member.

3. What do you expect to gain personally from serving in a Council position?
My reward will be as a member of a community that can finally afford to pay for adequate police and other vital services. I want to help Des Moines to come back from the brink of financial ruin. I expect nothing more for myself and for my family and neighbors than to be a part of such a community.

4. How should Des Moines react to the Port of Seattle’s proposed large and rapid expansion to Sea-Tac Airport and the increased noise and air pollution some say it will produce over the city?
Our proximity to the Sea-Tac Airport is like a two-edged sword. From one edge it benefits Des Moines with great potential for economic development, which can aid us in meeting our financial obligations and attaining our goals. From the other edge it represents a threat to our quality of life. If we damage the Port’s ability to operate profitably, then we damage our own potential to achieve our economic goals. But we can’t allow the huge benefits the airport brings to our entire region to disproportionately impact its nearest communities. We should partner with our neighboring cities to make sure the airport is prosperous, while also ensuring it doesn’t abuse any of us. Working together our chances for success and achieving a balance are much greater.

5. Do you consider the Marina seawall repair or replacement as a major financial problem facing the city and if not, what is the city’s biggest financial problem?
The seawall is certainly a major challenge, but one which should be manageable if we have a good economic development plan. Here’s four key points to understand. 1. Sea-Tac is the fastest growing airport in the United States. 2. Cruise Ships are the fastest growing sector of the tourism industry. 3. Every time a cruise ship docks it adds $2.6 million to the local economy. 4.Des Moines is the closest waterfront to the Sea-Tac Airport. The solution couldn’t be more obvious — we need cruise ships in Des Moines. With a solid plan for this type of development we can attract developers who will hopefully share in the cost of the seawall. Without it, we might even design and build a seawall that isn’t suitable for future use by cruise ships. The city’s biggest financial problem is a profound lack of vision for utilizing the unique advantages we have in Des Moines.

6. Do you believe paid Marina parking is the best way to finance the huge cost of the repair or replacement of the rapidly deteriorating seawall?
No, in fact, it’s one of the worst methods. Paid marina parking at this time is again working on the wrong side of the economic equation. Until a compelling vision of the Des Moines waterfront is defined we can’t attract new development and the revenue needed to address the seawall. Using paid parking now merely discourages use of the waterfront and drives away new development. It is essentially another tax — the same bandaid Des Moines has applied repeatedly over the last two decades and failed. This is the same logic that has led to the financial trauma Des Moines is currently suffering. Additional taxes can never compensate for a lack of fiscal discipline. Nor for a lack of vision.

7. What are your views on further development for downtown Des Moines, the Marina, and the city’s partnership with the Port of Seattle at the Des Moines Creek Business Park?
Please see my answer to #5 above. A new and improved waterfront to accommodate both cruise ships and an updated marina will undoubtedly spur new development in downtown Des Moines. Our city could potentially become an excursion destination itself, with hundreds of shops, restaurants, and other services for cruise ship travelers. But it could also provide services as a home port location. Regarding our partnership with the Port of Seattle at the Des Moines Creek Business Park, we should continue working with them for high quality development. Also, since they own the property beneath that entire business park, please see my answer to #8 below about police, property tax, and the Port.

8. Do you believe the Des Moines Police Department is doing a good job controlling crime in the city and, if not, what proposals for change would you recommend the Council adopt?
Yes, certainly, the police are doing a great job, given the resources they have.  But we need more budget for police and more police officers, because crime is far too high. Statistics show that crime in airport communities is four times higher than other areas. Our budget for police is paid in-part by property taxes, yet the Port of Seattle pays no property tax. So we need some type of compensation or mitigation from the Airport itself to assist with our police services. Without it, we are forcing our own citizens to bear the cost of providing security for properties owned by the airport. I’m also certified by Crime Stoppers and I recognize how their tools can help us significantly reduce crime in the city. I want us to utilize these tools more in the near future.

9. How would you propose Des Moines control increased card room gambling and marijuana sales along Pacific Highway South?
I would like to understand this issue of card room gambling more thoroughly, but it could probably be controlled through our zoning. We don’t need gambling in our city. It attracts crime. And as long as marijuana is still illegal in federal law, we place ourselves at risk by allowing it within Des Moines. Legalizing recreational marijuana in Washington state law doesn’t erase federal prohibitions. Placing ourselves in the middle of a conflict between state and federal law doesn’t benefit Des Moines. We have enough to worry about. Let other people carry the ball on this topic until there is no longer a conflict.

10. What is your view of the way the city now budgets and spends its money and where would you cut or increase spending?
There are many examples of other cities who have reduced their budgets by 10, 20, or even 30% without sacrificing services. The key is using our resources efficiently. Sandy Springs Georgia is a great example of a city operating efficiently. With about 100,000 residents they have only six or seven employees.  Most of their services are provided by contractors in a competitive market. I’m not suggesting we should go to that extreme, but we could do much better gaining efficiency without cutting services.

MATT PINA

1. How long have you lived in Des Moines and why did you decide to live here?
I have lived in Des Moines over 50 years. I grew up here, met my wife here, bought a home and raised my family here. The good people, the strong and diverse community, and beautiful surroundings are why we continue to be proud to call Des Moines our home.

2. What are your primary reasons for seeking election to the Des Moines City Council?
After serving for 8 years on the Highline School Board, partnering with community groups, citizens and representatives throughout the area, helping to turn around the financial, structural and educational challenges of the school district, I saw a similar need within Des Moines.

With the voters’ support I was elected in 2009. It didn’t take long to understand the multitude of challenges that have kept Des Moines from realizing its potential for the past several decades. As a leader and member of the city councils of the past 8 years, we have had to overcome a number of obstacles to move the city forward.  While there is more to do, we have accomplished a great deal in the past 8 years.

However, the biggest challenge came in January 2016 when I was selected as mayor along with Vic Pennington as Deputy Mayor. That night we were told that Des Moines was 18 months from bankruptcy and the City Manager would be retiring in 8 months. This picture was not acceptable.

Under my leadership with the partnership and joint commitment of the council, community and City administrative team we have changed the future of Des Moines. No stone was left unturned and all legal opportunities were reviewed. Our focus was to capture resources with as little impact to the City’s residents as possible. These have been difficult decisions, but had we not acted Des Moines would have gone bankrupt.
It took some very difficult decisions, but the tides are changing positively.

This is part of what we have accomplished in the past 18 months:

  • Passed a stainable budget (1st time in over a decade) – no longer looking at bankruptcy.
  • Ensured the structural revenue that supports City operations, Senior, Youth and Parks programs, and community support programs like the food bank etc.
  • Hired a new city manager and restructured the city to a collective leadership model
  • Added 6 new faces to our law enforcement team (5 positions and unfroze an opening)
  • Joined the regional task force against violent crime
  • Began a crime analytics program to aid in focused patrols
  • Developed a new comprehensive Policing model with enhanced policies that utilizes available resources to effectively address and the environment in which it thrives
  • Established a nuisance abatement program to clean up derelict properties that encourage crime and send the wrong message about our community
  • Restarted the road paving program that has not been active in over a decade
  • Worked with the Marina staff and tenants to address Marina finances, failing infrastructure and long term design issues (slips, floor layout etc.)
  • Created a Citizens Aviation Advisory to address the challenges of living next to one of the fastest growing airports in the country, focusing on remediation before mitigation.
  • Created a Citizens Advisory Committee to increase City/Community communications

These are examples of why experience maters. We have come a long way, but we are not there yet. I am running again to see that our progress continues and that we secure the livability, viability, sustainability and independence of the City of Des Moines for the long-term.

3. What do you expect to gain personally from serving in a Council position?
I am a lifelong resident and a known champion and representative for the Des Moines community. My personal gain is the same as that of the community. I will continue to contribute to the long-term health and viability of this City. I will continue to promote Des Moines as a destination and focus on preserving and enhancing quality of life issues for all of its citizens, both current and future. I want to assure that all who reside here have the opportunities and positive experiences that I have had the privilege of receiving.

4. How should Des Moines react to the Port of Seattle’s proposed large and rapid expansion to Sea-Tac Airport and the increased noise and air pollution some say it will produce over the city?
With respect to airport issues, I continue to advocate for Des Moines and the communities surrounding SeaTac Airport. This advocacy has included testifying before the Port Commission and the FAA about the need to address the impacts to the surrounding communities before growing the activity on the existing airport footprint. I have also been engaged in the discussion about tree management, highlighting the impacts and partnering with citizens groups to encourage alternatives. Additionally, I have helped to promote and support the creation of a Des Moines Aviation Advisory Committee and both recommended and supported the cities commitment to Representative Orwall’s particulate matter study. I also continue to listen and work with citizens groups like Quiet Skies.

Ultimately another airport must be sited. This will create a new location for some of the existing operations at SeaTac to move, providing the opportunity to limit activity on SeaTac’s existing footprint and relieve the impacts to Des Moines and the other cities in this area. I know this is doable, but acknowledge it will take work at multiple levels of government and require new types discussions.

Again, this is why experience maters. I will leverage my understanding of government and utilize my relationships with those in multiple positions to address any challenges to making this happen.

5. Do you consider the Marina seawall repair or replacement as a major financial problem facing the city and if not, what is the city’s biggest financial problem?
The City’s greatest financial challenge is ensuring long-term financial stability and services while addressing key infrastructure challenges like the repair of the Marina seawall. As noted in my prior comments, we are making great progress on all fronts.  However if we fail to address this seawall that is made of wood and over 45 years old with serious signs of deterioration, we run the risk of losing a major part of what makes our downtown and waterfront so inviting. In addition we will lose the emergency management benefits along with the future income and attraction that comes from being some of the most accessible waterfront in the region.

6. Do you believe paid Marina parking is the best way to finance the huge cost of the repair or replacement of the rapidly deteriorating seawall?
Many options were considered when determining how to find the resources to address the seawall issue before it fails. Many citizens aren’t aware that the Marina is a City enterprise fund and does not receive any tax payer revenue. This means it must cover all its expenses by the income it can generate. There are many forces that are limiting the Marina’s income potential (i.e. changes in fishing and leisure boating and the breakwater lease held by the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) that has increased  to over $110,000 per year, to name a few).  Paid parking is the only option that could generate enough revenue in the time necessary to effectively address the problem. Failure to address this failing infrastructure will cause us to lose much of our Marina possibly including access to the fishing pier. It is a matter of the right storm.

Key benefits provided by Marina Paid Parking include:

  • It provides the finances to repair (or bond for repair) the failing seawall.
  • It helps to recover Marina costs that come from users outside the City. (Approximately 75-80% of marina visitors live outside of Des Moines.)
  • It assists law enforcement in preventing illegal and nuisance activities in the Marina. Gates secure the Marina at night enforcing closure times. In the short time that paid parking program has been active, The Des Moines Police Department has already seen dramatic reductions in afterhours calls for service.  This makes more resources available to deploy into other areas and neighborhoods in the city, increasing the agency’s ability to provide a wider presence and more effectively fight crime in our community.
  • The north Marina area provides a critical link for regional emergency management services. Should there be an event in our region, it can support critical air (helicopter), land and sea access, providing necessary support to the surrounding communities.

In addition to the paid parking program, we are also working with our elected leaders in Olympia to get the DNR lease adjusted to a reasonable amount and possibly get some financial support that would allow us to address the repairs more quickly.

I remind the public of the violent storm that took out the Redondo Boardwalk. It was a healthy structure, just not strong enough to weather that storm.  At the time of this storm, the north parking lot of the marina was under water.  The Marina’s north seawall is not that strong and we were very lucky. The cost to repair that Boardwalk was over $4 million of which the City paid about 10%.  We are seeking that kind of multi-jurisdictional support to repair and secure the north seawall providing for the integrity of the infrastructure required to maintain the Marina.

7. What are your views on further development for downtown Des Moines, the Marina, and the city’s partnership with the Port of Seattle at the Des Moines Creek Business Park?
The partnership with the Port of Seattle in the development of the Des Moines Creek Business Park is an effective example of a public/private partnership. The property is in Des Moines but the Port owns the land. Panattoni Development is the private partner developing the property. This relationship is creating jobs and an ongoing economic engine that will help to not only sustain Des Moines future financially, it will provide the demand to enhance the quality of our downtown marina district (more shops and restaurants).  An added bonus is that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) regional headquarters will be located in this park. They will be able to experience and better understand the impact of their decisions locally.

8. Do you believe the Des Moines Police Department is doing a good job controlling crime in the city and, if not, what proposals for change would you recommend the Council adopt?
Under my watch we have created five new officer positions, an assistant chief and a detective position, bringing our patrols to full strength and ensuring effective and strategic engagement. A new policing model has been implemented that engages more of our already available resources, helping to eliminate attractive nuisance situations and aiding in the reduction of crime throughout the City.  The new detective position will represent the City on the Regional Violent Crimes Task Force, helping to effectively address gang violence regionally.  We have also enhanced our law enforcement abilities by adding Crime Analytics software to their toolkit. This allows them to visualize 911 calls for service and focus patrols as necessary.  We are also working with surrounding jurisdictions to improve communications between our respective departments and enhance the process for hiring new officers.

I regularly meet with members and leadership of the Des Moines Police Department.  I have also observed them in action during ride-alongs. Our police department is very professional, dedicated and competent. Looking forward, I will continue to ensure the effective allocation of resources and technologies that help our officers keep our city safe.

9. How would you propose Des Moines control increased card room gambling and marijuana sales along Pacific Highway South?
Marijuana sales are managed by specific zoning and state limited license availability. However under Washington state law, card room gambling can be an ancillary use for any restaurant. The City Council and City Administration pay a great deal of attention to these activities.

I will note that we are not having any problems with the current businesses, as they are well managed and have worked with our law enforcement team for guidance. For example, the marijuana store provides its own security team that wears body cameras. This has actually helped to reduce crime where they are located.

10. What is your view of the way the city now budgets and spends its money and where would you cut or increase spending?
Our key focus must remain on long-term sustainability. We have had to make some very difficult decisions. None of them were made lightly, but it is important for the community know that each one created a targeted solution to a serious challenge. We selected best option to address our challenges and take us forward as an independent, long-term sustainable waterfront community.

Some examples include:

  • Focused on the development of the business park. So far this has brought in over $600,000 in Real Estate Excise tax, in addition to other ongoing structural revenue.
  • Reorganized the City to maximize both budgetary and resource efficiency.
  • To address an understaffed police force, we installed red light cameras in high incident intersections and made sure the citizens were aware of these devices a month before they were activated. This has changed behavior positively, allowing our law enforcement team to remain out on patrol due to fewer accidents in these locations. They have also generated the necessary revenues to bring our law enforcement team up to appropriate staffing and provided dollars to support additional crime prevention and city management tools.
  • We have created franchise agreements with our utility districts that contractually ensure joint cooperation on community projects. These agreements define how the utilities will working together to maximizing the benefit and use of the public’s funds. The city does receive a typical franchise fee of 6% for use and access to our rights of way. It is important to note that these agreements were negotiated, not imposed, and agreed to by all entities.
  • Approved paid parking in the marina to help it generate the necessary revenues to address the long-term maintenance and infrastructure issues that come with being over 45 years old. Since tax payer dollars do not support the Marina, the solution had to be a revenue generator for the enterprise fund.
  • We now meet the appropriate reserve levels as required by the Washington State Auditor’s Office and for the first time in over a decade we have passed a budget with no one time moneys use to fill budget short falls.

In summary, there has been a great number of items to address so we can ensure the future of our great “Waterland” community. Under my leadership, working with the council, staff and citizens we have made some difficult be necessary choices. There are no excesses in the budget, only key allocations to get the City healthy and strong. This is why experience matters. We are on our way to being healthy again, but we’re not there yet.

ANTHONY MARTINELLI

1. How long have you lived in Des Moines and why did you decide to live here?
I’ve lived in Des Moines since I was 11. I moved here with my parents from Florida. Even when going to college and working in Olympia I chose to remain living in Des Moines and commute, rather than move, as I have a deep appreciation for the city.

2. What are your primary reasons for seeking election to the Des Moines City Council?
To bring forth progressive ideas and values to our beautiful city.

3. What do you expect to gain personally from serving in a Council position?
An opportunity to serve and improve the city I’ve spent the majority of my life.

4. How should Des Moines react to the Port of Seattle’s proposed large and rapid expansion to Sea-Tac Airport and the increased noise and air pollution some say it will produce over the city?
The city should do everything in its power to study the environmental and personal health impacts of overhead flights; prior to the results the city should advocate for stopping flight increases.

5. Do you consider the Marina seawall repair or replacement as a major financial problem facing the city and if not, what is the city’s biggest financial problem?
I believe it’s a major financial issue that needs to be properly addressed, but it’s far from our only financial issue. I believe a lack of proper funding for our police force, and social services, is also a big issue.

6. Do you believe paid Marina parking is the best way to finance the huge cost of the repair or replacement of the rapidly deteriorating seawall?
I believe strongly that Marina parking should be free for Des Moines residents. I do, however, think it’s a good idea to use parking revenue from out-of-city visitors to help repair the seawall.

7. What are your views on further development for downtown Des Moines, the Marina, and the city’s partnership with the Port of Seattle at the Des Moines Creek Business Park?
I believe the city should work to establish a centralized community center in the downtown area to help bring people together and give residents more things to do. In the same vein I support further renovations and expansions of city parks.

8. Do you believe the Des Moines Police Department is doing a good job controlling crime in the city and, if not, what proposals for change would you recommend the Council adopt?
I believe our police department is doing a great. However, do I believe they could benefit from an increase in the number of officers on duty at any given time (which is why I support increased funding for the department).

9. How would you propose Des Moines control increased card room gambling and marijuana sales along Pacific Highway South?
Placing a 5% city-wide tax on cannabis sales would result in nearly $500,000 in annual taxes for Des Moines based on sales data for the city’s only cannabis outlet. I support such a tax, and support allowing at least 1 to 3 more cannabis outlets throughout the city, stopping cannabis sales from being exclusively to Pac Hwy. As for card room gambling, if licensed and above-ground, I don’t oppose them, and believe they could bring revenue to the city if properly taxed. I believe increased police patrols along Pac Highway would go a long way in reducing crime.

10. What is your view of the way the city now budgets and spends its money and where would you cut or increase spending?
I believe the city should make an effort to reduce the cost of utility taxes, which for many people have gone up substantially in recent years and has placed a large burden on low-income families. I would like to see the city put more funding into their police department, which could be paid for by the above-mentioned city-wide cannabis tax. I also believe the city should spend more on infrastructure in order to increase jobs and grow the city.

WLB Real Estate Sponsor Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Northwest Real Estate will be holding three Open Houses this weekend, including Friday, July 14, Saturday, July 15, and Sunday, July 16:

This week’s first home is a lovely 5-bedroom home in the heart of Gregory Heights for $465,000:

Lovely home, in the heart of Gregory Heights, is steps from the Swim Club, blocks to the elementary school, has quick access to Olde Town Burien, freeways, SeaTac Airport, Seattle & more!

This 5 bedroom home has a spacious living room w/brick fireplace, formal size dining room & a kitchen w/ample cupboards & counter space plus 3 good-size bedrooms & full bath on the upper level.

Downstairs are 2 more bedrooms, rec room w/fireplace, laundry room & garage.

Fenced backyard, peach tree & shed.

Offers: Seller will review offers on Offer Review Date (may review/accept sooner) – 07/20/2017

WHEN:

  • Friday, July 14: 3 – 6 p.m.
  • Saturday, July 15: 1 – 4 p.m.
  • Sunday, July 16: 11 a.m. – 3 p.m.

WHERE: 16618 19th Ave SW, Burien 98166 (MAP, or see below)

INFO:

  • List Price: $465,000
  • MLS Number: 1155081
  • Bedrooms: 5
  • Bathrooms: 1.75
  • Year Built: 1962
  • Approximate House SqFt: 2,160 s.f.
  • Approximate Lot SqFt: 7,300 s.f.

Site Features:

  • Dbl Pane/Storm Windw
  • Dining Room
  • Security System
  • Vaulted Ceilings
  • Fenced-Partially
  • High Speed Internet
  • Outbuildings
  • Patio
  • RV Parking

Here are photos (click images to see larger versions/slideshow):

Click here to see the full, detailed listing.


The next Open House – open Saturday & Sunday – is a newly constructed urban single family home in West Seattle:

Welcome Home to West Seattle’s finest collection of Urban Single Family Homes!

With the endless amenities lets start with the homes featuring four bedrooms.

The ground floor features two bedrooms separated by a full bathroom.

As you ascend to your second floor LDK enjoy a full size kitchen with a half bath for your guests!

Your top floor features a master suite with a full bath and second bedroom with its own bathroom off the hallway.

This is a must see MRP new construction!

WHEN:

  • Saturday, July 15: 10 a.m. – 12 p.m.
  • Sunday, July 16: 12 p.m. – 3 p.m.

WHERE: 9405 35th Ave SW Unit A West Seattle, WA 98126 (MAP, or see below)

INFO:

  • List Price: $549,900
  • MLS Number: 1159291
  • Bedrooms: 4
  • Bathrooms: 3.25
  • Year Built: 2017
  • Approximate House SqFt: 1,687 s.f.
  • Approximate Lot SqFt: 1,342 s.f.

Site Features:

  • New construction
  • Ceramic Tile
  • Hardwood
  • Wall to Wall Carpet

Here are photos (click images to see larger versions/slideshow):

Click here to see the full, detailed listing.


The final Open House – open Sunday – is a two story, 3-bedroom town home with Lot A Beach Rights in Normandy Park:

Welcome to Normandy Chateau in highly sought-after Normandy Park!

This two story town home is nestled next to Marvista Park, Marvista Elementary School, only steps from Normandy Park Towne Center.

Living room with gas fireplace, kitchen with eating bar, and great outdoor space with both a front patio and back deck with park like setting.

Enjoy the pool during these hot summer days, newly completed community BBQ space, and great clubhouse for large parties.

And yes, it comes with LOT A Beach Rights!

WHEN:

  • Sunday, July 16: 1 p.m. – 4 p.m.

WHERE: 220 SW 200th St Unit 156 Normandy Park, WA 98166 (MAP, or see below)

INFO:

  • List Price: $279,950
  • MLS Number: 1160385
  • Bedrooms: 3
  • Bathrooms: 2.25
  • Year Built: 1968
  • Approximate House SqFt: 1,343 s.f.

Site Features:

  • Balcony/Deck/Patio
  • Insulated Windows
  • Master Bath
  • Walk-in Closet
  • Club House
  • Game/Rec Rm

Here are photos (click images to see larger versions/slideshow):

Click here to see the full, detailed listing.

Click here to view all of Berkshire Hathaway’s Open Houses, and click here to “Like” them on Facebook.

The annual Waterland Festival – a full weekend of fun summer events celebrating our Waterland Community – will be held from July 21 – 23.

This event is brought to you by Destination Des Moines as a Seafair Sanctioned Community Event.

Here’s what’s on tap:

  • July 21 – 23: Kids Carnival at the Field House – Bounce Houses, Obstacle Course, Climbing Wall, 9-hole Mini Golf, and more! Full Day Unlimited pass – $20.  Full Day Limited Pass – $15 (doesn’t include the larger apparatuses like the Climbing Wall) …  Single Tickets also available. Pony Rides and petting zoo!  Rates will be posted at the carnival.
  • July 21 – 23: Wooden Boats at the Marina
  • July 22: Waterland Parade: Kids start at 5:45 p.m. and the Grand Parade immediately follows. Starts at the Landmark and runs along Marine View Drive from South to North, ending at 216th.
    Notice of Temporary Road Closure on Saturday, July 22, 2017 – 4:45 p.m. to 8 p.m.

    • Marine View Drive South – from S 216th to S 242nd Street
    • Kent Des Moines Road – from 16th Avenue S to Marine View Drive
  • July 23: Wheels & Keels Car, Motorcycle, and Wooden Boat Show – 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.; Live Music, Food Trucks, and Beer/Wine garden. Enjoy the best of our Waterland Community with this full day festival. Dock Street will be closed until after 4 p.m.  Marina Parking will be available on the South end of the Marina.  Please note this is now paid parking on the marina floor.

REGISTRATION FOR THE PARADE AND CAR SHOW ARE LINKED BELOW:




The first day of paid parking at the Des Moines Waterfront Farmers Market saw some minor glitches but, overall it went fairly well. Just keep in mind we will validate 2 hours free parking for both Saturday & Wednesday markets. Just show your purchases at the market info booth. If you are a Des Moines resident and have a vehicle registered in Des Moines, you can get a yearly ($30) pass at the Marina office for $15 for the rest of this year.

Did you check out our new video at the top, spectacular! It is from Tad Doviak of Green Hippo Drones. If you are interested in creating one for you, email him tad@greenhippodrones.com.

Everyone loves ice cream and this time of year it is available every Saturday at the market. And what better way to satisfy your test buds than tasting a cone from vendor Sweet Bumpas. Matt Bumpas says all his creations are 100% hand made using only quality local ingredients. They also do office parties, weddings, birthdays and any event that you might have. YUM!!!!!!!!!!!!

Be sure to check to see if you qualify for our healthy eating initiative for low income families called Fresh Bucks, Come to the market, swipe your EBT card and it will double your dollars (up to $10) per person. This program is good for all market days (Sat & Wed).

This week check out the award-winning On-the-Grow Garden Truck from the Food Bank. Kids, families and seniors are encouraged to taste what’s growing on the truck and learn how to grow it at home. The program highlights Urban Agriculture which creatively uses small spaces and sustainable methods to equip communities to grow their own fruits, herbs and vegetables.

The Rotary Club of Des Moines and Normandy Park has a booth every Saturday to promote the Annual Poverty Bay Blues and Brews Festival. The festival this year is on August 26th at the Beach Park. At their booth you can buy your discount tickets in advance ($35, $40 at the event). Also get your raffle tickets for $5 for the grand prize, a Mariners luxury box suite at Safeco Field in early September. The package includes 23 tickets, $800 for catered food, 6 VIP parking passes and allows access to the Terrace Club lounges. There is a runner up prize of two season passes to Centerstage Theatre.  Last but not the least; you can enter to win $100 by texting the word Rotary to 555888.  You will receive a text with a link to your entry form.  Fill out the entry form and you are automatically entered to win. Text and data rates may apply. The proceeds benefit the Highline Music 4 Life program which puts instruments in the hands of kids who otherwise might not be able to have them.

Don’t forget the Des Moines Area Food Bank “Picnic in the Park” free summer lunch program for all school age kids. Look for them in the grassy area next to the marina office. And if you can’t wait until noon, they will serve free snacks from 10 to 11:30am and lunch from 11:30 to 1pm.  A child does not need to be a Highline Public School student to participate. They will be there every Saturday until school starts. Don’t forget in July & August the Sunset Market free summer dinner program will be serving snacks from 3:45 to 4:30pm and dinner from 4:30 to 6:30pm.  If you would like to volunteer to help with this program, contact the Food Bank 206-878-2660.

Seniors don’t forget that the market and the King Conservation District, with partner Sound Generations, are offering the HYDE Shuttle providing local door to door transportation to and from the market to seniors 55 and older and people with disabilities of all ages living in Des Moines, Normandy Park, Burien and Sea-Tac. Call 206-727-6262 to schedule a ride. The rides are every other week: July 15,29; August 12,26; September 9,23.

Be sure to get your application for the upcoming Clutter to Cash sale for July 22nd. You can sell all that odd ball stuff you have been moving from one side of your garage to the other. The 20 booth spaces are starting to fill up, so we are encouraging people to sign up early. The space fee is $20 and you must provide your own tables, chairs, etc. You can sign up at the information booth or download the application from our web site. The August 19 date is also available.

Upcoming Events

To keep up with all the special events, featuring what’s fresh and entertainment at the market, please log onto the web site and this weekly column. You can also keep up on the activities by visiting the market’s Facebook page. We have discontinued the e-newsletter.

Thanks to our sponsors:

The market takes place in the north Des Moines Marina parking lot, at 22307 Dock Ave S.:

From Advertiser DAL Law Firm:

How to Correctly Set Up Beneficiaries

In our estate planning practice, we many times work with clients who have questions regarding their beneficiaries, and there can also be confusion as to how your will or trust will intersect with your beneficiary designations. In our free estate planning consultations, we go over these questions and help to ensure that our clients have an overall comprehensive estate plan.

It’s important to understand that your will or trust will not control any asset which has a beneficiary designation. This means that whoever you have listed as the beneficiary of an asset is who will receive the asset upon your passing, regardless of what your will or trust states.

Here are some important things to keep in mind when it comes to beneficiaries:

  1. Ensure they are up to date. After certain life events occur (for example: marriage, newborn child, death, or divorce), people may not always keep their beneficiary designations in mind. However, doing so is very important to ensure that they accurately reflect your wishes.
  2. Name a secondary beneficiary. While most people will list their spouse or children as the primary beneficiary, many times, the secondary beneficiary will remain blank in the paperwork. It is very important to consider who you may want to inherit an asset in the event your primary beneficiary predeceases you.
  3. Don’t name a child who is a minor. In Washington State, a minor is not competent to receive an inheritance. If you would like to leave something to a minor, you’ll want to ensure that you work with an attorney who can assist you in properly setting up that inheritance.
  4. Naming a beneficiary other than your spouse. Washington is a community property state, meaning that most assets acquired during the marriage are presumed to be owned by the marital community. And while a person can name any person as a beneficiary of an asset, in Washington, or any other community property state, a spouse must sign a waiver if the beneficiary of an asset is to be someone other than your spouse.

If you need assistance in creating a new estate plan, or need to make changes – to your current estate plan, our office would be happy to assist. Give us a call today at (206) 408-8158 or visit us online at dallawfirm.com.

DarcelLobo

Darcel Lobo

Contact us:

19803 1st Avenue S.
Suite 200
Normandy Park, WA 98148

T (206) 408-8158
(206) 374-2810
E Darcel@dallawfirm.com

http://www.dallawfirm.com

https://www.facebook.com/DAL-Law-Firm-203308630032502/

The Des Moines Legacy Foundation has mounted a fundraising drive to replace all of the worn-out and aging playground equipment across the city’s parks system, plus add equipment at both the Beach Park and the Steven J. Underwood ballfields.

The 501(c)(3) non-profit charity is seeking to raise $200,000 in public donations to be used to leverage grants and corporate donations to complete the massive project that has a $2 million price tag.

Board President Gene Achziger outlined the benefits of maintaining outdoor public playgrounds:

  • Outdoors is the best place for young kids to practice and master emerging physical skills
  • It is there kids fully and freely experience motor skills such as running, leaping and jumping
  • It is the most appropriate area to develop ball-handling skills such as throwing, catching and swinging

It is also a difficult thing to attain right now in Des Moines given the critical condition of its public playground equipment, he said.

Replacing all of the playground equipment in Des Moines will not be cheap, Achziger said. “But what price do we put on the future of this community’s children? Will they reap the benefits of outdoor play?”

He said “The price tag will be $2 million, but through grants and by leveraging contributions, we can accomplish this monumental task if the public can raise $200,000.”

He said if the public does its part, the project is eminently doable since “We have the queen of grants on our side.”

Achziger said he was referring to Legacy Secretary Patrice Thorell, who as director of Des Moines’ Parks, Recreation and Senior Services department, has secured millions of dollars of grants to accomplish tasks such as restoring much of Beach Park.

“Your generous tax-free donation will have a big impact on the development of the next generation of Des Moines citizens,” he said. “We can do this.”

For more information and to donate, please visit Des Moines Legacy Foundation of Washington.

This Wednesday, July 12 will be a big day in Des Moines, with four big events at Beach Park:

4:30 p.m.: BEACH PARK HISTORIC DISTRICT PICNIC SHELTER DEDICATION
Help the City celebrate the reopening of the 1920s Picnic Shelter & 1945 Restroom on Wednesday, July 12 at 4:30 p.m.

5 p.m.: SMOKE ON THE WATER COMMUNITY BBQ
Community BBQ, Beer and Wine Garden, Root Beer Floats & Music on Wednesday,. July 12 5–7 p.m. Tickets at https://www.destinationdesmoines.org.

5 p.m.: LEGACY FOUNDATIONS’ BIDS FOR KIDS AUCTION
Supports activities and after school programs for low income youth on Wednesday, July 12, 5–8 p.m. No ticket required. www.desmoineslegacy.org

7 p.m.: BEACH PARK SUMMER CONCERTS START!
Great entertainment on the waterfront, starting with a FREE upbeat concert from Cordaviva this Wednesday, July 12, starting at 7 p.m. Beer & Wine Garden on site, donations welcome. https://www.destinationdesmoines.org

Cordaviva is a powerhouse of dance music influenced by the disparate rhythms and styles of the African diaspora. Their upbeat original music is a unique blend of soukous, rumba, Afrobeat, funk, and various Latin styles. Bright horns compliment sublime vocal harmonies (sung in various languages), soulful guitars, and relentlessly driving percussion.

Bring the whole family, your camping chair, a picnic and enjoy a variety of music enjoy the sun and sunset of Puget Sound.

Concert dates are on Wednesdays from 7–8:30 p.m., from July 12th – August 23rd.

For more information, click here.

By Jack Mayne

The first day of paid parking at the Des Moines Marina went well, with about 1,200 tickets sold Thursday (July 6), but that number does not include marina tenants or those who have a resident or frequent user passes.

Bill Linscott of the Marina tenants groups said congratulations were in order for the first day of paid parking.

“We saw everybody out there, the Marina staff was out there helping people through the gate today,” and added that validation from Anthony’s Restaurant went smoothly.

“Everybody is cooperating. So far, so good,” City Manager Michael Matthias said.

About 450 combined user passes have been sold so far, and roughly 10% of those are frequent users (people who live outside the City), with the rest being resident passes.

‘Beta’ parking test
Chief Operations Officer Dan Brewer reminded the Council that city staff has imposed a 45-day “beta test” of the Marina paid parking program.

“If there are issues before (the end of the test), we will address them and come back to County,” Brewer said. “At 45 days we will report back how things are operating. We have noticed that there are things that can be tweaked and made some adjustments already.”

Brewer reminded that paid parking at the Marina is about three things:

“Its about preserving our infrastructure and here are some pictures of our north bulkhead … there is a beam completely missing here,” he told the Council.

Vandal videos
“The revenue generated from this is intended to help pay for capital reinvestments in the waterfront zone and our bulkheads in particular,” said Brewer. “Secondly, it is to enhance law enforcement by regulating access, particularly at night both on the Marina floor at the beach park. Thirdly, to assure the north lot is available for emergency management operations” if they are ever needed in case of unforeseen events.

Brewer also told Council that making the changes also permitted them to add fiber optic cable which will “capture some really big benefits” that include added beach park security and “enhanced payment options” at the parking pay station, allowing for controlled access to the gate to the beach “so we know precisely who is coming and going out of that gate which we’ve never been able to know (before).”

There are still vandalism problems in the beach park area and the city is considering cameras down there that could be viewed at the police station so that officers could be dispatched, Brewer said, and recordings of such events could help convict miscreants.

Brewer said the marina and beach parking pay project original budget was $400,000 but the estimated cost to complete it is $610,000 with the additional amount offset by available real estate excise tax money and savings from other funds available to the city. The Council unanimously approved the changed budget.

4th is ‘trying time’
Police Chief George Delgado said the 4th of July is “a very trying time for the public” and he had some concerns expressed by citizens. He said the department is “fortunate” it survived another year and is seeking to “increase our efficiency in the future.”

He said there were 39 calls to the emergency 911 number, the same number of calls as last year.

“What I have to say is that the average spike for 911 calls in south King County went up 112 percent. Every city, fireworks ban or not, had a significant spike,” Delgado said. “We remained the same and I have to credit the staff for all the public education, all the efforts of warning our citizens and our community about the dangers and the fact that it is illegal to do fireworks.”

But, he said there were “some very loud explosions that are very frustrating for us.”

Manpower stretched
Traffic creates bottlenecks and visitors to the city sometimes include problem people from other places, the chief said, adding to the problems of citizen calls for service during such a holiday. At the same time that there is an increase of officers working the holiday in the busy marina, plus service calls from the eastern part of the city, city police manpower is stretched thin.

The use of alcohol increases in the evening of such holidays, increasing service calls and further stretching the limited manpower of Des Moines police.

“We can’t get to the concerns of our residents when we are dealing with these things, so we do our best and we are very fortunate that we survived another year,” Delgado said. Problems were in the Pacific Highway area, and from areas of the city where there normally are crime problems.

“It was pretty much spread around the city,” Delgado said.

City Manager Matthias said the problems of legal fireworks at the Marina and the illegal issue in the rest of the city and the new banning of fireworks in neighboring Kent is something he wants to take up with the Council at a later study session.

Other Council business
The Council voted to change the title of mayor pro-tem to deputy mayor to match earlier changes in city ordinances.

The Council voted to approve a supplemental agreement with Exeltech Consulting of Lacey for the Redondo Boardwalk Repair in the amount of $17,760.14 to complete construction administration and inspection services associated with project delay, bringing the total contract to $946,234.63.

Patrice Thorell, city Parks, Recreation and Senior Services director, said the vast number of community summer activities are all listed on the city’s website.

WLB Real Estate Sponsor Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Northwest Real Estate will be holding an Open House all weekend, including Friday, July 7, Saturday, July 8, and Sunday, July 9:

This week’s featured home is a stunning 5-bedroom 1920 Craftsman in West Seattle with sweeping views!

SWEEPING VIEWS on 3 levels: Sound, Olympics, Territorial.

A stones throw from Alaska Junction, this 1920 Craftsman boasts ORIGINAL crown molding and doors, leaded glass built-ins, original hardwoods; yet, updated for modern living.

NEW roof, appliances, and spacious deck with hot tub and fire table.

5 bed, 3 bath, 2 kitchen = option for large single-family or separate apartment.

Garage, driveway, solarium, fruit trees, and enough grapes to support a home winery make this house one-of-a-kind.

WHEN:

  • Friday, July 7: 4 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.
  • Saturday, July 8: 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.
  • Sunday, July 9: 12 p.m. – 3 p.m.

WHERE: 4727 45th Ave SW West Seattle, WA 98116 (MAP, or see below)

INFO:

  • List Price: $1,200,000
  • MLS Number: 1154509
  • Bedrooms: 5
  • Bathrooms: 3
  • Year Built: 1920
  • Approximate House SqFt: 3,300 s.f.
  • Approximate Lot SqFt: 6,350 s.f.

Site Features:

  • VIEWS!: Mountain, Partial, See Remarks, Sound, Territorial!
  • 2nd Kitchen
  • 2nd Master BR
  • Bath Off Master
  • Dining Room
  • Hot Tub/Spa
  • Jetted/Soaking Tub
  • Loft
  • Security System
  • Solarium/Atrium
  • High Speed Internet
  • Patio
  • Shop

Here are photos (click images to see larger versions/slideshow):

Click here to see the full, detailed listing.

Click here to view all of Berkshire Hathaway’s Open Houses, and click here to “Like” them on Facebook.

If you see or hear what appears to be an emergency at Sea-Tac Airport on Wednesday, July 12, don’t worry – it’s merely a full-scale exercise simulating an aircraft accident.

These emergency exercises are required every three years by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and this one will run from around 6 a.m. to around 1 p.m.

Area first responders will participate in the exercise, and we are alerting our Readers of potential emergency vehicle activity you may see at the airport during this time – THIS IS AN EXERCISE ONLY.

Preparations for the exercise will begin as early as 6 a.m. with the exercise scheduled to start at 10 a.m. and conclude no later than 1 p.m. The exercise location will be on the far north end of the airfield below the elevation of the center runway near S. 156th St. A mock aircraft fuselage is in place at the site for first responders to practice.

The exercise will NOT affect or delay any air travel. Both of Sea-Tac’s two other runways will be open as normal and the exercise will NOT affect any customer activity within the terminal. Residents nearby the airport may notice emergency vehicles responding as part of the exercise.

Up to 150 volunteers will participate as ‘victims’ next to the mock aircraft fuselage which comes from a former Boeing 757 shipped from Moses Lake specifically for this exercise. Volunteers will arrive at approximately 6 a.m. for moulage (or make-up) to represent a variety of injuries that will test medical care triage practices.

Dozens of the King County area mutual aid police and fire agencies will participate in the exercise with an estimated 50 -75 pieces of equipment from fire engines to aid cars and up to 175 fire fighters. Additional police officers from the area are also expected to participate alongside first responders from the Port of Seattle Fire and Police Departments, Sea-Tac Airport Security, Airport Operations, Public Information and the Port Environmental team.

In addition, other key exercise participants will include airport and airline representatives, the FAA, Red Cross, King County Emergency Management Division, and the King County Medical Examiner.

A comprehensive report will be prepared post-exercise to identify any gaps in emergency plans and then prioritize follow-up corrective actions.

To see photos and info about a previous emergency exercise, click here.

Sea-Tac Airport is one of the fastest growing airports in the nation, with 3.4 million more passengers last year than in 2015. With the highest total annual number of arrivals and departures in the state, it is a vital economic driver in South King County.

But are these benefits taking a toll on the well-being of those living in the area?

Reps. Tina Orwall (D-Des Moines) and Mike Pellicciotti (D-Federal Way) want to know to what extent the volume of air traffic at the airport is affecting communities in their districts, so they secured money in the Operating Budget to fund a UW study and find out.

“This is a critical first step in a full impact study to determine the effects the airport activity has on our communities,” said Orwall, whose House Bill 1171, called for a study of the environmental impacts associated with aircraft traffic, including ultrafine particulate matter air pollution. “I am relieved that we managed to get these funds because it’s only through studies of this nature that we can fully understand the health impacts and learn how to mitigate their effects.”

“The full extent of airplane traffic effects, including noise and vibration, have not been fully examined in all of South King County,” said Pellicciotti, who had sought funding in the Capital Budget for a study to determine noise, vibration, and air quality issues, including the ultrafine particulate matter, in and around his district. “This is an important first step to independently slow the effect on our community.”

Orwall’s bill never made it to the House floor for a vote, and the Capital Budget was not moving and has yet to pass the legislature, so the two members from neighboring districts worked on finding a different path. They succeeded at securing $250,000 in the Operating Budget for the University of Washington to complete a study on the air quality implications of air traffic at SeaTac International Airport.

The UW School of Public Health will:

  • Determine and map the extent of impacts in the area surrounding the airport.
  • Assess the concentrations of ultrafine particulate matter in areas surrounding and directly affected by air traffic generated by the airport.
  • Identify the footprint of aircraft exhaust through particle number monitoring.
  • Carry out a future study of the health effects once the extent of exposure is better known.

The university will coordinate with local governments to share results and collect feedback from community members, and will report study findings and recommendations to the legislature by December 1, 2019.

Sea-Tac air traffic not only impacts communities surrounding the airport, it has a pronounced regional effect. For example, in Beacon Hill, which is higher in elevation, residents are much closer to overhead aircraft traffic, and it is the neighborhood with the highest childhood asthma hospitalization rate and adult deaths due to chronic lower respiratory diseases.

Dr. Roseanne Lorenzana, co-Chair of Community Health Advocates Collaboration Against Aircraft Emissions & Noise, and resident homeowner of Seattle’s Beacon Hill neighborhood, said that preliminary studies done elsewhere suggest exposure to ultrafine particulates from aircraft emissions can worsen asthma symptoms.

“This study will provide important information about the degree of our exposure to help us identify protective measures for our children and elderly. We are grateful to Rep. Tina Orwall as well as co-sponsor Rep. Sharon Tomiko Santos for their diligent work in creating the opportunity to conduct this work,” Lorenzana said.

Rep. Tina Orwall, D-Des Moines (33rd Legislative District), represents part of King County including SeaTac, Des Moines, Normandy Park, and part of Kent, Burien and Renton.

 

The Des Moines Waterfront Farmers Market was busy last Saturday at the start of the 4th of July weekend.

Paid parking is to start July 6, so remember that we will validate 2 hours free parking for both Sat. & Wed. markets. Just show your purchases at the market info booth. If you are a Des Moines resident and have a vehicle registered in Des Moines, you can get a yearly ($30) pass at the Marina office for $15 for the rest of this year.

Did you check out our new video at the top, spectacular! It is from Tad Doviak of Green Hippo Drones. If you are interested in creating one for you, email him tad@greenhippodrones.com.

WIC is a nutrition program that helps pregnant women, new mothers, and young children eat well, learn about nutrition and stay healthy. WIC is the “Federal Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children.” Check out their booth this coming Saturday where you can get information and sign up for this program.

Be sure to check to see if you qualify for our healthy eating initiative for low income families called Fresh Bucks, Come to the market, swipe your EBT card and it will double your dollars (up to $10) per person. This program is good for all market days (Sat & Wed).

You will fall in love with our New Market Vendor The Tamale Guy’s” handmade Tamales. They are a mobile pop up that sells delicious gourmet tamales inspired by family recipes, and made with a lot of love. Owner Juan Garcia’s tamales are handmade every time, as well as all his salsas, masa, escabeche, and hand cut cabbage repollo.  You can buy them singularly or order them by the dozen to enjoy at home. Their tamales are all gluten free, dairy free, and their veggie tamales are completely vegan. They vacuum seal them and package them for you for maximum freshness, and they are handmade by them the night before, or day of!

Music – Note-Ables

Food Tucks –  Charlie’s Buns N Stuff, Jemil’s, Nibbles

The Rotary Club of Des Moines and Normandy Park has a booth every Saturday to promote their Annual Poverty Bay Blues and Brews Festival. The festival this year is on August 26th at the Beach Park. At their booth you can buy your discount tickets in advance ($35, $40 at the event). Also get your raffle tickets for $5 for the grand prize, a Mariners luxury box suite at Safeco Field in early September. The package includes 23 tickets, $800 for catered food, 6 VIP parking passes and allows access to the Terrace Club lounges. There is a runner up prize of two season passes to Centerstage Theatre.  Last but not the least; you can enter to win $100 by texting the word Rotary to 555888.  You will receive a text with a link to your entry form.  Fill out the entry form and you are automatically entered to win. Text and data rates may apply. The proceeds benefit the Highline Music 4 Life program which puts instruments in the hands of kids who otherwise might not be able to have them.

Don’t forget the Des Moines Area Food Bank “Picnic in the Park” free summer lunch program for all school age kids. Look for them in the grassy area next to the marina office. And if you can’t wait until noon, they will serve free snacks from 10 to 11:30am and lunch from 11:30 to 1pm.  A child does not need to be a Highline Public School student to participate. They will be there every Saturday until school starts. Don’t forget in July & August the Sunset Market free summer dinner program will be there serving snacks from 3:45 to 4:30pm and dinner from 4:30 to 6:30pm.  If you would like to volunteer to help with this program, contact the Food Bank 206-878-2660.

Seniors don’t forget that the market and the King Conservation District, with partner Sound Generations, are offering the HYDE Shuttle providing local door to door transportation to and from the market to seniors 55 and older and people with disabilities of all ages living in Des Moines, Normandy Park, Burien and Sea-Tac. Call 206-727-6262 to schedule a ride. The rides are every other week: July 15,29; August 12,26; September 9,23.

Be sure to get your application for the upcoming Clutter to Cash sale for July 22nd. You can sell all that odd ball stuff you have been moving from one side of your garage to the other. The 20 booth spaces are starting to fill up, so we are encouraging people to sign up early. The space fee is $20 and you must provide your own tables, chairs, etc. You can sign up at the information booth or download the application from our web site. The August 19 date is also available.

Upcoming Events

To keep up with all the special events, featuring what’s fresh and entertainment at the market, please log onto the website and this weekly column. You can also keep up on the activities by visiting the market’s Facebook page. We have discontinued the           e-newsletter.

Thanks to our sponsors:

The market takes place in the north Des Moines Marina parking lot, at 22307 Dock Ave S.: