Advertiser Des Moines United Methodist Church will be presenting an evening of music with meditation interludes – Rutter’s “Requiem” – on Thursday, April 10th at 7:30 p.m.

This will include a choir and instrument ensemble, with Teresa Lin soprano soloist, and Martin Culbert conducting.

FREE admission, with donations accepted for the music ministry.

Des Moines United Methodist Church is located at 22225 9th Ave. South (9th & 223rd); 206-878-8301

www.desmoinesumc.org

Ellen Dorr believes moving sixth grade to middle school will have a positive impact on students.

Teacher Ellen Dorr believes moving sixth grade to middle school will have a positive impact on students.

The Highline School District announce Friday (April 4) that it will be moving 6th grade to Middle School, starting in the 2015-16 school year “or later.”

The district said the decision to make the move comes “after months of studying enrollment projections, staff and community feedback, and academic research.”

“I am thrilled that sixth-graders will finally be in a place that is developmentally appropriate for them. Sixth-graders belong in middle school,” said Des Moines Elementary School teacher Nicole Malmgren, who has taught sixth grade for five years.

“Everybody always talks about the fear of putting 11-year-olds with 14- and 15-year-olds, but what about putting 11-year-olds with five-year-olds?” added Malmgren. “How is that pushing them forward? They fit in with their middle school peers better than they do five-year-olds in kindergarten.”

Malmgren plans to work with Human Resources to obtain her math endorsement so she can move with her sixth-grade students.

Currently, Highline’s elementary schools are grades K-6, and middle schools are grades 7 and 8.

“In our current model, middle school can be overlooked as simply a bridge between elementary and high school, but I believe middle school has its own merit and deserves its own focus,” said eighth-grade teacher Ellen Dorr, who has taught language arts at Cascade Middle School for ten years. She is excited for sixth-grade students to join the Cascade community.

Teacher Nicole Malmgren wants to move with her sixth-grade students to middle school

Teacher Nicole Malmgren wants to move with her sixth-grade students to middle school, saying they belong in middle school.

The 6-8 grade configuration is the most common middle school model nationwide, and it’s not a new concept in Highline. A task force made up of Highline teachers, administrators, and parents researched middle school models in 2009. The research showed that K-6 and 6-8 configurations can be equally successful and that quality of classroom instruction and school climate are the primary factors in student achievement.

“At the end of the study, there was a desire to move sixth grade to middle school, but we didn’t have nearly enough space,” said Chief Accountability Officer Alan Spicciati, who co-chaired the task force. Building new middle schools was not an option at the time, given the recession.

“This is something we’ve wanted to do for a while now,” said Spicciati. “We just needed the right opportunity to make the move. Now, we have an opportunity to do it.”

Today, Highline needs more classroom space at elementary schools. The state is now funding full-day kindergarten and offering money for smaller class sizes. To take advantage of class size dollars, Highline must add 55 more classrooms across the district. Elementary schools are already full or over capacity. Without available classrooms, Highline may lose out on up to $2.2 million annually in new state funding for class-size reduction.

Cascade Middle School students reading independently during class.

Cascade Middle School students reading independently during class.

“I am confident the decision to move sixth grade to middle school is in the best academic interests of our students at all grade levels,” said Superintendent Susan Enfield. “It allows us to eliminate crowding and decrease class sizes at elementary schools, and it also gives us an opportunity to increase the academic rigor and broaden learning experiences for sixth graders.”

In middle school, sixth-grade students will be taught by subject area specialists who get deep training and professional development in their content areas, rather than generalists who have to be able to teach all subjects. The rigorous instruction prepares students for higher level course work, especially important in math and science.

“Right now I have a classroom with students at a third-grade level in math and reading, and students at a ninth- or tenth-grade level in math and reading,” said Malmgren. “It is difficult for me, as one teacher, to teach such a huge range of learners. When the students move to middle school, they will be able to take classes that are specific to their needs.”

Sixth-grade students are also likely to become more engaged in school as they pursue subjects they are particularly interested in–electives such as engineering, journalism, and vocal and instrumental music.

“Middle school students attend elective classes daily, which allows them to explore a subject more deeply,” said Cascade Middle School Principal Diana Garcia. “In elementary school, they only get music and PE twice a week.”

In addition, families and students will have three full years to develop relationships with teachers and staff, providing consistency and predictability during a critical period in students’ lives.

Teacher Ellen Dorr believes sixth-grade students are ready for middle school.

Teacher Ellen Dorr believes sixth-grade students are ready for middle school.

“The fact that students will attend the school for another year means we can create a stronger sense of community with students,” said Dorr. “Seventh-grade students are more than ready for the transition to middle school. With smart work at both the elementary level and the middle school level, we can ensure that sixth-grade students finish elementary school ready to enter middle school.”

This spring, Highline will begin a year-long planning process with teachers and parents to design the sixth-grade program.

“This is an opportunity to reinvent the sixth-grade experience for our children and improve the entire middle school program,” said Superintendent Enfield.

Creative ideas for sixth grade were already being suggested at recent community meetings on the transition proposal. For instance, sixth grade could be designed as a self-contained program within middle schools. Camp Waskowitz could be a sixth-grade orientation and community-building experience in the fall.

In middle school, students will get a chance for a jump start at advanced coursework like world languages, algebra, and the sciences. They will benefit from greater exposure to the fine arts and leadership opportunities. And they will be challenged to develop the behaviors, attitudes, and habits they will need to succeed in high school and college.

by Dave Markwell

My son, Aden, turned fifteen. How this happened I do not know. Time, I suppose, does this. Time and a couple of rare, but fortunate, demonstrations of parental self-discipline during those moments when I wanted to kill him myself. Kids can make us crazy and this boy is no exception. For a while, “bonehead, “knucklehead” and a variety of other “head” suffixed names became his. At fifteen, I believe we may have turned a corner. (Jinx alert here!!)

While he is still highly capable of some supremely stupid things, these incidences are increasingly rarer. His mind and heart are good. He is kind and works hard at the things he should work hard at, a notable exception being cleaning his room. He is funny and creative and thoughtful. He’s smart and articulate and wise in ways that are good to be wise. He cares about the world and is shaping his role in it. It’s fun being his dad.

I really like him. As parents we are probably obligated to love our kids, though I’m not sure we have to like them. Some kids are very challenging to like, even for their parents, I suspect. Liking someone may be more personal preference and choice than love. Sometimes, we can’t help loving someone, even if we don’t like them. I’m glad I like this boy.

As a dad I worry about my influence screwing up a pretty good kid. I can recall in great detail my own dad’s successes and failures. Moments when he said or did the right things shaped me, as did the moments when he said or did the wrong things. We never know our score as a parent. Our kids keep the scorecards to themselves, though occasionally when observing them in action, we catch a brief glimpse of our influence. Sometimes this is good and sometimes this is bad. The results speak for themselves.

So, at fifteen, my son and I still have a few miles ahead of us. My hope is that we travel well: we make a few good choices and throw in some bad ones for a little color and share some smiles about both. Perfect parenting has never been my goal. I am not foolish enough to prescribe myself a destiny of failure. My only wish for my kids is joy in life. Joy will only come through the truest expression of their unique gifts, of which they are blessed with many. I hope to support this whenever and wherever I can. My place in their journey is sometimes conductor, sometimes riding shotgun. They decide where I sit. And this is ok with me…

(Sidenote: To all the other parents believing their son is the best one…you’re wrong…because, I’ve got him.)

[EDITOR'S NOTE:"Feel Good Friday" is a regular column written by Des Moines resident Dave Markwell, who just published his first book called "A Feel Good Life" (buy it on Amazon here). Dave also extols to all neighbors: "Enjoy where we live. Put your feet on the pavement and truly feel how great it is to live here!" Also, you can "friend" Dave on Facebook here. Or work out with him at his exercise company Waterland CrossFit!]

WLB Real Estate Sponsor Berkshire Hathaway Home Services Northwest’s Open House – set for this Sunday, March 9 – is a stunning, remodeled 5-bedroom view home in West Seattle!

With Sound and Mountain views, this 2460 square foot home has it all.

Hardwood floors, Stainless Steel Appliances, Granite counter tops all filled with natural Light from the sunny south western exposure.

All the work is done just move in and enjoy your view deck and backyard patio this spring!

Walking distance to restaurants, Starbucks, West Seattle Thriftway and renowned Lincoln Park.

Here are some pics (click images to see larger versions/slideshow):

603995.jpgx

603995-02-alt.jpgx

603995-06-alt.jpgx

603995-04-alt.jpgx

603995-05-alt.jpgx

603995-03-alt.jpgx

603995-08-alt.jpgx

603995-12-alt.jpgx

603995-01-alt.jpgx

603995-11-alt.jpgx

Here are the details:

WHAT: Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Northwest Open House.

WHEN: Saturday, April 5, 1 – 4 p.m. and Sunday,April 6, 1 – 4 p.m.

WHERE: 6340 40th Ave SW West Seattle, WA 98136

INFO:

  • List Price: $619,000
  • MLS Number: 603995
  • Bedrooms: 5
  • Bathrooms: 1.75
  • Year Built: 1912
  • Approximate House SqFt: 2,460
  • Lot Square Footage: 4,800

Site Features:

  • Bath Off Master
  • Dble Pane/Strm Windw
  • Loft
  • Skylights
  • Walk-in Closet
  • Deck
  • Fenced-Fully
  • Patio

Marketing remarks:

Sound and Mountain View Gatewood Home!

This stunning remodeled 4 bedroom 2 bath 2460 square foot home has it all.

Hardwood floors, Stainless Steel Appliances, Granite counter tops all filled with natural Light from the sunny south western exposure.

All the work is done just move in and enjoy your view deck and back yard patio this spring!

Walking distance to restaurants, Starbucks, West Seattle Thriftway and renowned Lincoln Park.

Click here to see the full, detailed listing.

Click here to view all of Prudential Northwest’s Open Houses.

Advertiser Wesley Homes will be holding a seminar called “Living Large in Small Spaces” on Thursday, April 17, from 11 a.m. – 1 p.m.

“Join us and see how a few key features bring personality, space, comfort and functionality to any room,” reads an announcement. “Say no to the burdens of a big house, and say yes to the freedom of a cozy home.”

Guests will enjoy a tasty lunch, win door prizes and get tips on living more simply.

“Plus, see current move-in specials on apartments that are perfect for you!”

Wesley Homes is located at 816 S. 216th Street in Des Moines.

RSVP online at wesleyhomes.org of call Joanie or Lynn toll free at 1-855-445-8827.

DMMarinaSketch14

by Jack Mayne

The Des Moines City Council has taken the first tentative steps toward developing the city’s marina floor from a collection of older buildings, boat storage sheds and parking lots into a year-around destination event and small marketplace.

After a presentation by Good Fit Development and its partners, Councilmember Melissa Musser moved that the city staff begin negotiations to work out a development agreement and a ground-lease contract for the marina.

Musser said she had become involved with the development of a plan four and a half years ago when she was appointed to chair the Municipal Facilities Committee that began considering how the city should maximize the asset of the marina.

“Our marina is a very unique asset that no other cities have and yet it could be so much more,” Musser said.

Study started in 2012
The council heard about the preliminary research of a marina development plan at the Council session on March 27.

“Back in early 2012, this City Council began a public process to consider the feasibility of development at the Des Moines Marina,” said Marion Yoshino, the city’s economic development manager.

She said the Council formed a citizens advisory committee that included Council member and stakeholder representatives during which various options were considered. It included retail shops, restaurants, small hotels, office and even residential.DMMarinaOverview14

“The committee’s work resulted in a final recommendation that blended two proposed use configurations with restaurant, retail and possibly hotel development as preferred options.”

The city, she said, has the opportunity to recreate the marina as a destination “that attracts thousands of visitors.” She told the Council that a particular plus would be creation of an indoor venue that visitors could utilize year around.

The space for development on the marina floor is “extremely limited,” Yoshino said. “A carefully created development plan is needed.”

City Manager Tony Piasecki said the city’s administrators were seeking direction from the Council on the next steps in the program and wanted the legislators to direct the city staff to enter into “detailed negotiations” to come up with an agreement “for some sort of development on the marina floor” that could be brought back to the Council for final approval.

Musser’s motion to do just that was passed unanimously on Thursday (March 27).

The informal developer group that will negotiate a plan with the city include Steve Monkewicz of Good Fit Development; Ed Young, local representative of Westlead Capital of Taipei and Matt Wittman of Wittman Estes Architecture and Landscape, Seattle.

Monkewicz was the lead briefer to the Council Thursday evening.

He said he has spent a lot of time in the area, eating at Anthony’s Home Port and walking and running on the paths around the Marina area and said he has “long desired” a better use for the area.

“I fully appreciate the community recognizing that there is potential for more use for that site beyond the predominant current use of surface parking and boat storage. We feel our proposal has a strategy that creates added purpose for locals to engage with the marina in that stunning location as well as a destination for visitors from the region and beyond to visit the community.”

DMMarinaDrawing14

The initial ‘Master’ plan
This plan proposes redevelopment of three parcels totaling 3.06 acres on the marina floor.

“Phase One” would include a permanent culinary market located at the site of the current Harbor Master’s office and would mean the replacement of the surface parking area and a small grassy area.

“Phase Two,” would include the area currently serving as boat storage and parking.

A third facility would be located in back of the Harbor Master’s current office where surface boat storage currently exists. This building would be three levels and replace parking capacity that would be lost in Phases One and Two and provide additional parking overall along with ground floor office and retail space.

The developers say the “overall design embraces sustainability principles and promotes the greatest asset, which is the west-facing promenade directly on the Puget Sound overlooking the Olympic mountain range.”

They say “all development will orient itself to maximize the relationship between the building, people, views and exposure to the marina. The site layout will enhance the pedestrian flow along the waterfront walk way and create lines for a pathway on the south perimeter.”

The developer says that if the city selects this proposal, “further facility stacking and placement analysis will be completed to minimize disruption of Marina operations and maximize the natural beauty of the site, notably with the juxtaposition of the market and hotel facilities.”

They suggest “Marina functionality is a top priority. The Harbor Master’s office will be relocated to a new facility that includes additional parking space, a few feet away from its current location. Boat service and repair operations will remain on the marina floor. Boat storage facilities would be relocated to other locations within the marina floor or underutilized lots along the perimeter of the marina floor.

“Added public spaces and enhancing existing public access and enjoyment spaces” is also a priority.

“One area of public space to enhance is the Cliff View Municipal Park,” says the developer’s initial plan. “Adding a pedestrian elevator and stairwell with connectivity through the parking structure and providing thoughtful landscaping adjustments, will significantly enhance connectivity to the downtown area and visibility overall.”

All is now negotiable between the developer group and the city.

Some concerns expressed
Councilmember Musser said Good Fit was the company that talked with the Farmers Market vendors and customers, also people in the community about potential development.

“I’m really excited to see where this goes next,” she said.

Councilmember Jeanette Burrage said she was concerned about parking.

“We already have trouble in the summertime with parking so if we add a marketplace and we add a hotel, we are going to have even more trouble with parking spaces,” Burrage told the Council. “It seems to be that developers a lot of time reduce the amount of parking so they can build more things and that can come back and bite you. Keep that in mind as you make the further design.”

Mayor Dave Kaplan said it is hard for him to see how the proposal matches up with marina oriented businesses – “I guess I am going to want see not only the parts but the whole at some point in time to see how it all fits together.” He added that parking is a critical concern.

Monkewicz said a parking garage planned for the site would “increase parking substantially,’ and its construction would be moved forward in the construction phase to alleviate concerns. He added that the functionality of the marina is going to be major consideration in their plan.

Screen Shot 2014-03-29 at 9.25.37 PM

Screen Shot 2014-03-29 at 9.25.49 PM

Screen Shot 2014-03-29 at 9.25.58 PM

Longtime Des Moines resident Clark B. Snure passed away on Wednesday, March 26 at age 83.

Clark opened a law firm in town in June of 1964, and served on the Chamber of Commerce, the Woodmont Elementary PTA, the Des Moines Rotary Club, the Des Moines Legacy Foundation and the Des Moines Arts Commission. He also served on numerous boards and committees in his effort to make the community of Des Moines a better place. Clark also taught legal classes for many years at Highline Community College.

“Although our father had many talents and interests, his life was defined by his three primary passions, family, work and husky football!” according to a memorial the family posted online.

Clark was a huge UW Husky fan, first purchasing season tickets as a college freshman in 1948 yet remaining a season ticket holder to the present day – that’s 66 years of being a Dawg!

In addition to his sons Kraig, Kirk and Brian, Clark is survived by his two daughters in law, Leslie and Donna, two grand daughters, Erika and Emily and two grandsons, Axl and Colton.

In lieu of flowers, remembrances in Clark’s honor can be made to the Des Moines Rotary Foundation (P.O. Box 98073, Des Moines, WA 98198) or the Des Moines Legacy Foundation (P.O. Box 13582, Des Moines, WA 98198).

Here’s the full memorial posted by his family:

In Loving Memory
Clark B. Snure
April 30, 1930 – March 26, 2014

It is with great sorrow that we must share that our father, Clark B. Snure, passed away peacefully March 26, 2014. It is with great joy that we remember a father, husband and friend that lived a full life and left the world a better place than he found it. Clark was born in Puyallup in 1930 and grew up in Edgewood with his father Clark and his mother Clara. By all accounts it was a good life growing up in rural Edgewood, with places to roam with his friends and his dog. He shared with us stories of long drives into Seattle on Military road to visit family, winters skiing at Paradise on Mt. Rainer, summer days of camping on the deserted islands of Lake Tapps and the toils of working on the local daffodil farms.

Our dad graduated from Puyallup High School in 1948 and was the first of his family to attend the University of Washington. Financial difficulties required that he take a quarter off but he joined Alpha Sigma Phi, worked as a house boy and joined ROTC to help pay his way through school. After graduating from the UW he served two years in the Air Force and during this time met the most amazing woman, Marilyn Krekow Snure, our mother. Clark and Marilyn were married in 1955 and dad attended law school at the University of Washington while our mother taught school. After graduating from the UW law school in 1958 Clark joined the faculty of the University of Washington Law School and then in 1959, joined Kumm, Maxwel, Peterson & Lee, a small firm in downtown Seattle. After five years, Clark decided that he wanted to establish his own firm and set his sights on the City of Des Moines where, in June of 1964 he opened his law practice with few clients but many dreams.

In 1966 mom and dad completed building their house in Des Moines and settled down with their three sons Kraig, Kirk and Brian and began living the family life. After settling in Des Moines, Clark became very active in the Des Moines community, joining and leading the Jaycees, the Chamber of Commerce, the Woodmont Elementary PTA, the Des Moines Rotary Club, the Des Moines Legacy Foundation and the Des Moines Arts Commission. Clark served on numerous boards and committees in his effort to make the community of Des Moines a better place. Clark also taught legal classes for many years at Highline Community College.

Our father had many interests in life including jazz music and, in his later years developed his artistic talents by creating metal artworks that he would generously donate to local charity auctions. Although our father had many talents and interests, his life was defined by his three primary passions, family, work and husky football!

Together with our mom, dad always put family first. Although he worked hard and worked a lot he always made time for family, from serving as PTA president and building the cardboard box mazes for the annual Woodmont Spring Thing, to taking us camping, hiking and travelling throughout the West, he was a role model that gave each of us a solid foundation in life. In addition to his sons, Clark is survived by his two daughters in law, Leslie and Donna, two grand daughters, Erika and Emily and two grandsons, Axl and Colton. He will be deeply missed.

While serving his community and raising his family our father also built a thriving and successful law practice and was a member of the Washington State Bar for fifty years before he retired. In 1964, shortly after opening his law practice Clark was asked if he would serve as the secretary to the Board of Commissioners for King County Fire Protection District No. 26. Little did he know that his decision to take on that role would place him at the forefront of the development of fire district law and management over the next four decades.

Clark’s accomplishments in the fire service are legendary. In addition to his forty-five years as secretary to the Board of Commissioners of King 26 (South King Fire and Rescue) Clark personally represented over 400 fire districts and fire departments many of which have now merged or disappeared through annexations.

Clark served as the draftsman for the committee that rewrote the laws governing fire districts in the 1980’s and was the driving force behind years of educational development of fire districts in Washington. Beginning in the 1980’s Clark and the Director of Washington Fire Commissioner’s Association decided to begin educating fire commissioners, chiefs and secretaries on the legal requirements surrounding the operation of a fire district. In the early years Clark would barnstorm the state presenting numerous seminars per year. Over his career, Clark has presented hundreds of seminars and classes in Washington and Oregon and authored over 13 handbooks covering all facets of the fire districts and the law. Because of Clark’s efforts, the fire service in Washington today is far more sophisticated and professional than it would have been without the guidance, thought and passion that he brought to the practice of law and the representation of fire districts.

Screen Shot 2014-03-29 at 9.26.11 PMFinally, we can’t talk about our dad without mentioning Husky football. He first purchased season tickets as a college freshman in 1948 and remained a season ticket holder to the present day, 66 years of being a Dawg! While he missed a few games here and there, each of us knew and followed his rule that we couldn’t get married on a home game day! We will never forget tailgating with mom and dad down by the Forestry building in the “good old days” and later in the Montlake lot. His passion for the University of Washington is captured by the fact that his three sons also graduated from the UW and he now has two granddaughters at the UW carrying on his legacy.

At our dad’s request we do not plan on having a public memorial service but will likely have a public celebration of his life sometime this spring. We also ask that in lieu of flowers, remembrances in his honor be made to the Des Moines Rotary Foundation (P.O. Box 98073, Des Moines, WA 98198) or the Des Moines Legacy Foundation (P.O. Box 13582, Des Moines, WA 98198).

by Dave Markwell

An old man died this week. Probably many old men died this week. I only knew one of them. This old man lived in my hometown of Des Moines, Washington for nearly 50 years. His contributions to the community were, if not unmatched, certainly uncommon. My city is better because of him; his ideas, efforts and his commitment to service. We were very lucky to have had him as a citizen.

In the later years of his life, as his health diminished, life got hard for him. Driving, walking and many other of the much taken for granted ordinary tasks of living became difficult and frustrating. He lived a tough time of life with all the dignity and humanity he could muster. All pretense was stripped raw.

I first saw Clark in an old black and white newspaper clipping in a photo album my mom kept. He was sitting next to my mom at some type of civic event organizing meeting. He wore a smile and hair. The picture was taken in the mid-1960’s.

In high school during the mid-80’s, I remember, with no fondness, his early Saturday morning weed wacking outside of my buddy, Dan’s, bedroom window. Clark was Dan’s neighbor and as I often stayed the night at Dan’s house following our teenage adventures, I was a sleepy and hungover victim of Clark’s diligent adherence to his weekend chores. I did not like Clark on these mornings.

Later, I joined the Rotary Club and Clark was a fixture. While his health was poor, his presence was strong. He was a guy that had “done it”. He did not need to prove anything to anyone. He was much admired and loved. In his last years, he was still highly respected and relevant. His life was one worthy of high regard and lives as a model for me: a bit disheveled, not giving a crap about what anyone else thinks, kind and still relevant is a good way to go…I think…

Over the past few years, Clark could often be seen shuffling around the Marina, moving slowing behind his walker, his hair a mess, stopping only to take a sip of his Jack in the Box milkshake (chocolate, no whipped cream, no cherry). I imagine what the kids gathered around their cars thought as Clark strolled by. It is likely they thought little of this slouched, saggy old guy moving slowly with his milk shake and sweatpants. They missed it.

We all miss it. The kids had no idea of this man’s gifts, his service, his deeds, his bright mind, his big heart and big contributions to the very lives they were able to have because of him and people like him. They only saw what they saw. They missed it. Overlooked was Clark’s impact on the world. And it was a big thing to miss.

Clark’s waning years told a story, but not the whole story. I think this is true for many old people. They get defined as old and we forget they were young. We forget that they built the roads we travel on. They fought the wars, created the businesses, defined the policies, had the ideas and DID IT long before we did. They lived it and DID IT!

As I get older, I find my grandparents words ringing more and more true. In my youth, back when I knew everything, I politely listened to their words then, discarded them. I had it figured out. They were old and didn’t “get it”. I was wrong. They got it. I didn’t get it. I don’t think many people get it and maybe we can’t get it until we’re old. This may be a curse. We have much to learn from our old folks. They are the back bone of our world. They created the framework of our lives.

Today, more old people will die. But, some will die tomorrow. With the time they/we have together appreciate them a little more. Listen to them. They can still teach us valuable lessons. We owe them, and ourselves, this and so much more. And we should aspire to grow old, perhaps a bit unkempt, funny and impatient, but still very alive and still relevant. Like Clark did.

[EDITOR'S NOTE:"Feel Good Friday" is a regular column written by Des Moines resident Dave Markwell, who just published his first book called "A Feel Good Life" (buy it on Amazon here). Dave also extols to all neighbors: "Enjoy where we live. Put your feet on the pavement and truly feel how great it is to live here!" Also, you can "friend" Dave on Facebook here. Or work out with him at his exercise company Waterland CrossFit!]

WLB Real Estate Sponsor Berkshire Hathaway Home Services Northwest’s Open House – set for this Sunday, March 30 – is an absolutely lovely Northwest Contemporary home with soaring ceilings, gleaming hardwoods on main level and huge sun-filled windows – in Normandy Park with beach rights!

This 3-bedroom home features a beautifully-updated kitchen with stainless steel appliances, an extremely spacious master suite, two other bedrooms, plus bonus room and office/craft area.

The updated main bath is truly amazing and the dining room is large enough for several guests. Outside features a fabulous wraparound deck and 2 car garage/2 car RV/carport.

Oh, and did we mention Lot A beach rights?

Here are some pics (click images to see larger versions/slideshow):

605580.jpgx

605580-01-alt.jpgx

605580-04-alt.jpgx

605580-03-alt.jpgx

605580-02-alt.jpgx

605580-08-alt.jpgx

605580-12-alt.jpgx

605580-20-alt.jpgx

Here are the details:

WHAT: Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Northwest Open House.

WHEN: Sunday, March 30 from 11 a.m. – 3 p.m.

WHERE: 128 SW 208th Street, Normandy Park, WA 98166

INFO:

  • List Price: $499,950
  • MLS Number: 605580
  • Bedrooms: 3
  • Bathrooms: 2.5
  • Year Built: 1978
  • Approximate House SqFt: 2,920
  • Lot Square Footage: 15,681

Site Features:

  • Bath Off Master
  • Dble Pane/Strm Windw
  • Dining Room
  • Security System
  • Skylights
  • Pantry

Marketing remarks:

Absolutely lovely Northwest Contemporary home with soaring ceilings, gleaming hardwoods on main level and huge sun-filled windows!

This home features a beautiful updated kitchen with stainless steel appliances, an extremely spacious master suite, two other bedrooms, plus bonus room and office/craft area.

The updated main bath is truly amazing and the dining room is large enough for several guests.

Outside features a fabulous wraparound deck and 2 car garage/2 car RV/carport.

Lot A beach rights!

Click here to see the full, detailed listing.

Click here to view all of Prudential Northwest’s Open Houses.

Highline Community College is seeking nominations for the 2014 Distinguished Alumnus Award, which honors former Highline students who have “made significant contributions through community service, noteworthy professional achievement and/or recognized leadership.”

Highline began the award in 1990 with Norm Rice, former Mayor of Seattle, chosen as the first recipient. Past recipients have included Junki Yoshida, Founder and CEO of the Yoshida Food Group, Joan Enticknap, President and COO of Homestreet Bank, Highline’s own Dr. T.M. Sell, and last year’s winner, respiratory therapist and manager of Haborview Medical Center’s Respiratory Care department, Carl Hinkson.

Eligible nominees are former students who attended Highline prior to the 2009-2010 academic year and have made a significant contribution through community service, noteworthy professional achievement and/or recognized leadership.

Nominations may be submitted by faculty, staff, students, friends of Highline, or any alum. Nominees will be asked to submit a resume and personal profile questionnaire for review by a campus selection committee. The person selected will be recognized at the commencement exercises on June 12, 2014.

Nomination forms are available online at alumni.highline.edu/distinguished/nominate.php. Please send submissions by April 25, 2014 to mgridley@highline.edu or to:

Highline Community College Alumni Relations
PO Box 98000 MS 99-248
Des Moines, WA 98198

Please contact Madison Gridley at (206) 592-3312 or by e-mail at mgridley@highline.edu with questions.

Highline Community College was founded in 1961 as the first community college in King County. With approximately 18,000 students and 350,000 alumni, it is one of the state’s largest institutions of higher education. The college offers a wide range of academic transfer and professional-technical education programs, with day, evening and weekend classes. Alumni include former Seattle Mayor Norm Rice, entrepreneur Junki Yoshida, former Washington state poet laureate Sam Green and even this blog’s Founder/Publisher, Scott Schaefer.

KNITTERS CORNER STARTS AGAIN

Are you a fiber lover?

Share your yarns, patterns, celebrate sharing knitting and crochet skills and accomplishments, get assistance with tricky needles and share your current fiber affair with Virginia Bird and other fellow fiber lovers.

Knitters Corner starts meeting again in April, every Tuesday from 1 – 3:30 p.m. at the Des Moines Activity Center, located at 2045 S. 216th St.

For more information call 206-878-1642.

A new self-help group has arrived in Des Moines – Messies Anonymous – which is “for people who have too much clutter.”

“We have weekly meetings to study how we got the way we are and how to change,” they said. “In fact, the only requirement for joining the group is a desire to change.”

This group meets in the North Hill area of Des Moines every Wednesday from 10:30 a.m. – Noon.

“We are having an open meeting on April 2, 2014 followed by a brown bag lunch from 12 to 1. If you have a problem with clutter you are invited to join us for the meeting then stay for lunch to ask more questions, get to know other “messies” and find out how we have changed our lives.”

There are no dues or fees; however Donations are accepted.

For more information contact Elizabeth at 206-248-2922.

by Marine View Law & Escrow

DID YOU KNOW…

…that Marine View Law & Escrow can help you obtain a loan modification and reduce the principal amount owed on your mortgage?

Here at Marine View Law & Escrow we’ve helped many clients save their homes through loan modifications. We assist with not just first mortgages, but second mortgages as well. With a loan modification, we’re able to cure the default amount owed, and modify your monthly mortgage payment to an amount that is feasible for you and your family.

In addition to modifying the terms of your mortgage, as of March 2012, the US Department of Justice recently announced a $25 Billion Mortgage Settlement with five of the country’s largest mortgage lenders. In short, this settlement agreement requires these five lenders: Bank of America, Chase, Wells Fargo, CitiGroup, and Ally Financial, to provide financial relief to consumers.

What does this settlement mean to homeowners? The settlement requires the lenders to collectively contribute $20 Billion towards various forms of relief for homeowners. The primary form of relief being provided is a reduction of the principal amount owed on loans for homeowners who are in default and owe more on their mortgage then the home is worth. 75% of the $20 Billion in relief is required to be provided to homeowners within two years, which means that many homeowners will be entitled to such relief.

If you mortgage is through one of these five lenders: Bank of America, Chase, Wells Fargo, CitiGroup, or Ally Financial, or you receive any notifications in the mail regarding your eligibility for principal forgiveness, be sure to give us a call right away so that we can help you determine your rights, assist you with a loan modification, and save your home.

If you are facing financial hardship and are in default on your mortgage, and would like to keep your home and look into the possibility of a loan modification, give our office a call at (206) 878-8777 or visit us online at www.marineviewlaw.com.

photo 1

photo 2

photo 3

photo 4

photo 5

Phase 2 of Advertiser El Dorado West is scheduled to be completed in August, 2014.

“Since our groundbreaking for the new $14 million building on July 31, 2012, El Dorado West has come a long way,” reads a note on their blog. “After completing Phase I construction in the summer of 2013, we introduced the public to the first part of our brand new building, now leasing! Phase II construction is currently underway and will open a second brand new building to the community. Visit our photo album here to view more construction progress pics. See more at: http://www.villageconcepts.com/el-dorado-west/2014/03/20/phase-ii-construction-progress-at-el-dorado-west/#sthash.riGmH3R5.dpuf

Along with Independent and Assisted Living, El Dorado West will offer memory care.

Celebrating more than 35 years in the Burien community, El Dorado West opened the doors to their brand new building in the fall of 2013 and is expected to complete construction on an additional brand new building in 2014. Click here for more information on our remodel project.

El Dorado West is conveniently located close to Seahurst Park, Salmon Creek, Puget Sound, and not far from Seattle and Sea-Tac Airport. Relax and enjoy retirement amidst a thoughtful, caring community with access to excellent health care facilities, shopping malls, bus lines, and the excitement of downtown Seattle. Residents enjoy major league sports, world-class art and theater all within a 15-minute drive.

By using a simple yet comprehensive fee schedule, our retirement community offers you the security and freedom of a healthy, independent lifestyle … without the time-consuming responsibilities of expensive home ownership.

At El Dorado West, we strive to enhance the quality of your life. Whether you are pursuing an active, independent lifestyle or you require more personal living assistance, it’s all part of a very simple philosophy: bring retirement to life at El Dorado West!

Assisted living services are available.

El Dorado West is located at 1010 SW 134th Street in Burien; 206/248-1975.

Stay turned for the Grand Opening Event!

The Des Moines Auxiliary of Seattle Children’s Hospital will be presenting its annual fashion show and luncheon on Thursday, April 17, starting at Noon.

The event will be held at the Landmark on the Sound Event Center, located at 23660 Marine View Drive South, in Des Moines.

The doors will be open at 11 a.m., and tickets are a $30 donation.

The theme this year is “Queen of Hearts,” opening our hearts to help the children.

There will be door prizes, and raffles.

The lunch will be catered by “A Grand Affair” and the fashion show is hosted by Rottles of Auburn.

The proceeds will go toward the uncompensated care fund of Seattle Children’s.

The deadline to reserve tickets is April 3, 2014.

For more information or to order tickets please call 206-824-4746 or 206-878-1239.

Highline Public Schools is sharing the results of a community survey that asked the public to provide feedback on how to solve challenges have arisen due to increased student enrollment and aging buildings.

“Overall feedback shows support of the district’s initial proposal,” reads an announcement.

The online survey was conducted over four weeks in January and February and was completed by nearly 1,500 participants, including 730 Highline employees. The survey asked participants for their feedback on plans to expand school capacity and improve outdated school facilities.

“In order for our students to succeed, we must marshal the collective commitment of our entire community,” said Superintendent Susan Enfield. “This survey allows us to learn what our community’s priorities are as we work to ensure a high-quality educational experience for all of our students.”

Here is an overview of the results:

  • 60% of all survey participants consider current crowding at elementary schools very serious.
  • 8 out of 10 survey participants state some or full support for moving 6th grade from elementary to middle school.
  • 7 out of 10 participants are supportive or very supportive of building a new middle school.
  • 8 out of 10 participants are supportive or very supportive of building a new elementary school.
  • About half of all participants are very supportive of rebuilding Des Moines Elementary School and Highline High School and repairing Evergreen Campus.
  • 8 out of 10 participants are supportive or very supportive of repairing Tyee Educational Complex.
  • Participants ranked “Building a new Des Moines Elementary School” as their top improvement priority.

The district will use the data to in developing solutions that address the need to provide more classrooms, allowing schools to reduce class size in grades K through 3, and to formulate a list of school construction projects that could be included in a bond measure on an upcoming ballot.

“Community support plays a critical role in the success of our learners,” Enfield added. “Together, we will deliver on our promise that every student is known by name, strength, and need and graduates prepared for college, career, and citizenship.”

To view detailed survey results, please visit www.highlineschools.org/yourvoice.

Sound Transit will be hosting a series of neighborhood drop-in sessions through April 17 to give the public a chance to hear about alternatives for extending light rail service from SeaTac to Federal Way.

The agency has identified several alignment, station and grade alternatives for extending light rail from the future Angle Lake Station at S. 200th Street, which opens in 2016, to the Federal Way Transit Center near S. 320th Street, a distance of about 7.6 miles.

Forecasted voter-approved funding is sufficient to cover the extension of service to the Kent-Des Moines area by 2023, with extensions further southward subject to identifying additional funding sources. Sound Transit will prepare a Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) to evaluate potential environmental impacts and benefits of the identified alternatives. The DEIS is expected to be available for public and agency review later this year.

Here are the times:

  • Des Moines: Wednesday, March 26 5:00 – 7:00 PM Highline Community College, 2400 S. 240th Street
  • Federal Way: Thursday, March 20 5:00 – 7:00 PM Federal Way Library, 34200 First Way S.
  • Kent: Tuesday, April 8 Noon – 2:00 PM The Market Place Plaza, 2311 Pacific Highway S.
  • Kent: Thursday, April 10 Noon – 2:00 PM Lowe’s, 24050 Pacific Highway S.

flash-mob-dance

Organizers of the 2nd annual ‘Burien UFO Festival’ (aka BUFO) are seeking volunteers to participate in a ‘Flash Mob Dance’ at the event on Tuesday night, April 1, with the first rehearsal set for this Sunday, March 23.

The first rehearsal will be this Sunday, March 23, from 4:30 – 6 p.m. at Forest Ledge, a historic 1915 located next to Eagle Landing Park at 14611 25th Ave SW in Burien’s Seahurst neighborhood.

Volunteers – who can just show up Sunday – should park in the neighborhood, then walk down towards Eagle Landing Park; look for the big open gate to the north (on the right as you walk down) and head down the long driveway to the mansion.

Dancers are asked to wear comfortable shoes to the rehearsal.

Choreography will be taught at the rehearsals, and Dancers can then watch a practice video to rehearse on their own.

“You do not need to be a dancer to participate!” reads an announcement. “We’ve got some awesome songs and fun choreography that pretty much anyone can learn. So find your flash mob shoes and get ready to surprise Burien with an out-of-this-world FLASH MOB!”

Dancers can come dressed in regular street clothes OR come dressed as Men in Black, Women in Black or Aliens!

To RSVP, please Join the Facebook Event Page here: https://www.facebook.com/events/479533812146491/

Be sure to “Like” the BUFO Facebook Page here!