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Two films made by area residents will be screening at upcoming film festivals in Tacoma and Gig Harbor.

The alien abduction thriller feature “The Device,” Directed by Jeremy Berg, and the short “The Maury Island Incident,” Directed/Produced by Scott Schaefer, Written/Produced by Steve Edmiston, Produced by Laura Beth & Scott Peterson and Danny House, Executive Produced by John White with Music by David Templeton, will screen on these dates:

TACOMA FILM FESTIVAL:

THE DEVICE:

  • Tuesday, Oct. 14 at 9:15 p.m. @ THE GRAND CINEMA #1 – BUY TICKETS

THE MAURY ISLAND INCIDENT:

GIG HARBOR FILM FESTIVAL:

THE MAURY ISLAND INCIDENT:

Both films were produced locally, with scenes shot in Des Moines, Burien, Tukwila and off Maury Island.

One interesting element these two films share is the casting of local Actor David S. Hogan, who plays FBI Agent Mitchell in “The Maury Island Incident” and Calvin in “The Device.”

Synopses:

THE DEVICE:
Abby and Rebecca Powell haven’t seen each other since a traumatic event in their youth ripped them apart. Reunited for the first time in over a decade, the sisters take a trip to spread their mother’s ashes at a secluded lake. As the sisters reconnect and try to heal old wounds, something waits in the nearby woods. A strange object, made not by the hands of man, beckons them to it. As they begin to try to unlock its secrets, Abby is plagued by nightmares of an alien presence that seem all too real. Little do the sisters realize that this object is actually a device, one with a purpose too horrible to comprehend. As the events of the past and the present begin to merge, new discoveries will threaten to tear apart their newly reformed family, and the inhuman creators of the device will attempt to finish a terrible experiment begun years before.

THE MAURY ISLAND INCIDENT:
“The Maury Island Incident” is a short film based on a long-forgotten UFO encounter that happened off Maury Island, WA on June 21, 1947. This often-overlooked incident happened just two days before Ken Arnold’s Mount Rainier sighting, which spawned the phrase ‘flying saucers,’ and 16 days before the infamous Roswell crash. It also included what is considered by many experts to be the first “Men in Black” encounter as well. Directed by Scott Schaefer and Written by Steve Edmiston.

Here are trailers for each:

THE DEVICE:

The Device Festival Trailer from The October People on Vimeo.

THE MAURY ISLAND INCIDENT:

The Maury Island Incident Trailer #1 from The Maury Island Incident on Vimeo.

“The Device” will be released on DVD & VOD by Image Entertainment on Dec. 16: (http://www.dreadcentral.com/news/77859/exclusive-artwork-premiere-device#axzz3CamTYrMD)

More information here:

THE DEVICE:

THE MAURY ISLAND INCIDENT:

UPDATE 6 p.m. Oct. 5: The Des Moines Police Department just announced that they just received word our missing young lady has been found.

“She was located by family members somewhere in Seattle,” police said. “She is in good health and a family member is taking her home to be reunited with her mother. Thank you to everyone for their assistance!”

PREVIOUSLY:

The Des Moines Police Department is asking for the public’s help in locating a missing 21 year old, disabled woman named Christina Stringer:

MissingChristinaStringer

Police say that Christina has significant learning disabilities and is unable to care for herself.

She left her home in the 24500 block of 26 Place S. at about 12:15 p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 5.

She was last seen walking, barefoot, towards Highline College.

“We have received reports that she may have been dropped off by a Southbound Metro bus, in the 22400 block of Pacific Highway South, around 4 p.m.,” police added.

Christina Stringer is an Asian female, five feet four inches tall, with a thin build and long brown hair. When she was last seen she was wearing a green shirt and red skirt with flowers on it.

If you see Christina please call the Des Moines Police Department at 206-878-3301 or 911.

Here’s a good idea: Cheer on the Seattle Seahawks this Monday night, Oct. 6 as they dive into Monday night football at Advertiser ACME Bowl in Tukwila.

Things kick off at 5:30 p.m.

In the bar (for folks 21 and over) check out the Coors Light Draft specials. Add a loaded pepperoni 10″ pizza for only $5.

Afterwards, well, why not bowl? ACME’s 30 state-of-the-art lanes feature the latest in automatic pinsetter capabilities.

ACME Bowling, Billiards, and Events is an exciting entertainment venue and is a terrific place to have your company party or corporate event.

ACME, located just east of the Westfield Southcenter mall, is closer to where you live or work than you might think.

We checked it out. You can more than likely get to ACME Bowl in less time than it takes to put on your bowling shoes and bowl your first frame.

The food. Have you eaten there lately? Well, check it out. A perfected menu awaits you at their restaurant, The Break Room. Gourmet burgers and sandwiches, salads and much more personally crafted by chefs who very much care about what they’re serving you.

The Break Room is a great place to take a date, treat Mom and Dad, meet old friends or co workers.

The couches and dramatic lighting combined with expertly mixed drinks, Washington wines, and microbrews set a dramatic mood in the bar and lounge.

Planning a meeting or company event? Put ACME Bowl on the top of your list. ACME staffers are first rate professionals. They’ll help you impress your boss, the staff, your new clients.

ACME is locally owned and operated by people who like bowling, enjoy running a good business and truly care about the Pacific Northwest.

Plenty of parking and they’re close to the freeways.

ACME Bowling • Billiards • Events
100 Andover Park West
Tukwila, WA

Phone (206) 340-2263

Facebook: facebook.com/acmebowl
Twitter: @acmebowl
www.acmebowl.com

by Dave Markwell

I enjoy potluck dinners very much. Though, I have learned through many years of attending these events to always bring what I like. Having been disappointed too many times in the past by lofty expectations of someone else bringing something awesome, I have taking matters into my own hands. So, I now bring something I am certain that someone will like. That “someone” is ME. I do not leave the fate of my appetite’s satisfaction to others.

All of this SAID, I still really love potlucks. Most of the time, a vast array of delectable deliciousness fills the long table. New twists on old ideas and simply brand-new recipes broaden my food consumption experience. I like this. I like new stuff. While I always have my parachute dish handy should the table look like a plane wreck about to happen, most of the time, it is unnecessary. People cook some good stuff.

Another beautiful thing about a potluck is that all the different foods are contributed by many different types of people. The folks surrounding the table are often as varied and colorful as the food on it. Different outfits, hairstyles and ideas create a mosaic of humanity. This is as interesting to me as a new BBQ chicken marinade. And I really like chicken marinades.

A potluck of people is a tasty dish as well. We all bring something to the table. Sometimes it’s crappy, but sometimes it’s delicious. A fresh perspective, a new idea, a compelling story make the human potluck worthwhile. Our different spins on how a life can be lived opens minds and hearts. Without the various options, the meal would be bland. We need different perspectives to expand our palate of what’s possible. Lots of unexpected ideas taste good. It’s important to try them. You can always pull the ripcord on the parachute dish or hide the un-yummy stuff in your milk…

[EDITOR'S NOTE:"Feel Good Friday" is a regular column written by Des Moines resident Dave Markwell, who just published his first book called "A Feel Good Life" (buy it on Amazon here). Dave also extols to all neighbors: "Enjoy where we live. Put your feet on the pavement and truly feel how great it is to live here!" Also, you can "friend" Dave on Facebook here. Or work out with him at his exercise company Waterland CrossFit!]

Photo by Michael Brunk / nwlens.com

Photo by Michael Brunk / nwlens.com

Photo by Michael Brunk / nwlens.com

Photo by Michael Brunk / nwlens.com

Photo by Michael Brunk / nwlens.com

Photo by Michael Brunk / nwlens.com

Photo by Michael Brunk / nwlens.com

Photo by Michael Brunk / nwlens.com

Photo by Michael Brunk / nwlens.com

Photo by Michael Brunk / nwlens.com

Photo by Michael Brunk / nwlens.com

Photo by Michael Brunk / nwlens.com

Photo by Michael Brunk / nwlens.com

Photo by Michael Brunk / nwlens.com

Photo by Michael Brunk / nwlens.com

Photo by Michael Brunk / nwlens.com

To listen to the audio from our Candidate Forum, click the “Play” button above.

by Jack Mayne
Photos by Michael Brunk

Critical money needs for schools and local government were at the crux of the debate between State Rep. Mia Gregerson and candidate Jeanette Burrage at a forum on Tuesday’s (Sept. 30) for the 33rd District race.

Mia Gregerson, in her opening statement, said she is at the place in her career where “I really wanted to give back” and the area of policy is where I could be most valuable.”

She is a SeaTac City Councilmember elected by fellow members to be Mayor of the city until after the next election in 2015. She said she was an orphan adopted in Taiwan and she grew up first in Enumclaw, and is now one of four generations living in the SeaTac area. She has a 20-year old daughter now attending the University of Washington.

Jeanette Burrage is a Des Moines City Councilmember, a former legislator and judge.

“I am running for state representative because I want to help people,” Burrage said in her opening statement.

She said she was a Scout den mother while in high school because there was no one else available and went to Highline College before going on to get her law degree and serving for five years as a King County Superior Court judge. She was a Republican state representative in 1981 and 1982.

City Council seats
Burrage said she would give up her seat as a member of the Des Moines City Council if she is elected to the Legislature. Her Council term runs until the end of 2015, as does Gregerson’s.

“We have lots of good people in Des Moines to take my place,” Burrage said.

“One of the reasons I am running is because I’ve noticed that the state has made it more difficult for cities to fund police and roads and things that we need by keeping revenues that used to go to the cities. I want to bring small city views to the Legislature and try to get restored the money that was taken away … from all the cities with the liquor tax.”

Gregerson said her decision on retaining her city position “is still unclear.”

“I am not sure because right now I am the vice chair of the (House committee on) local government and I recognize there are a lot of voices I am able to come back home and speak to being in local government.”

Being partisan
Gregerson said it first caused her “a bit of concern” when asked if she could make the case for being a Democrat in the Legislature versus a nonpartisan city council member.

But she noted the House Democratic majority in the past session passed a budget that would have financed public schools more fully, as required by the state Supreme Court’s decision in the McCleary case.

If people think about supporting “homeless, hungry children in our community, then you will see that the Democrat forces are very strong in supporting those values.

“I am very, very proud to be a Democrat,” Gregerson said.

Burrage said she thought “Republicans will look more to the future, do long-term planning to make sure that our children get educated whether in colleges or trade schools so they will be able to get jobs here.

“Right now, Microsoft and other big companies are importing people with degrees that are available here. We need to be sure that our kids get the jobs that are available here. We also need to make sure there are jobs by supporting businesses and not making taxes so outrageous that businesses aren’t able to open or go out of business.

“People sometimes get the idea that Republicans don’t care about people (but) I want to assure you that I do and so do the local Republican that I know,” Burrage said.

Burrage on school money
The two candidates were asked about the Legislature’s attempts to increase common school financing as required by the state Supreme Court.

Burrage said the Legislature made a first step during the past session and that the state’s economy is improving “so we will have some additional revenues to put into education.”

She said more dollars must go to the colleges so that students can afford to attend them, but that the state should not take “whatever federal dollars are offered because they come with a lot of strings.”

“I think we are going to have to make some tough decisions which may mean some cuts in things.”

She said over the last 30 years that education, including colleges, has gone up nearly 300 percent but “everything else has gone up nearly 600 percent so there has been a trend towards doing other things besides education.”

The state should now “reverse that” and put dollars where they will do the best for education, Burrage said, including putting more money into colleges. She said she would fight against spending state dollars to become eligible for federal grants or for matching funds.

Gregerson on school money
The state budget is “our precious document on how to support our values,” Gregerson said.

But it will not be “on the backs of professional (employee) development or it’s not going to be on the backs of not being able to capture the federal dollars that we want to reduce classroom sizes,” Gregerson said. “It is not going to be kids or concrete – we need to pass a transportation package.”

So much money is needed, but so little is available, so she said a legislative joint committee has already agreed there is a $66.6 million sum that can be used plus tax loopholes that can be closed to raise revenue.

Increase minimum wage?
The push by some groups, especially the Service Employees International Union, for local city increases in the minimum wage from the state’s current $9.32 could go to the Legislature.

Seattle has legislated a $15 per hour wage to become effective over a period of time, while SeaTac voters last November approved a $15 an hour minimum for some hospitality and transportation workers. That wage will increase to $15.24 next year.

Burrage and Gregerson were asked if they would support a statewide minimum wage in the $15 range.

Gregerson said the issue should be discussed by the Legislature, but she supported a general view that the current state minimum is too low.

Burrage said she believed in the free enterprise system and does not think it is the job of government “by fiat to declare what individual business owners are going to pay their own employees.”

Burrage said businesses would have to cut other expenses in order to pay the higher rate if it did go into effect. If minimum pay rates are increased, it should only be by the state, not local jurisdictions.

Work with opposition
Both candidates said they could work with legislators of the opposite party to craft laws that would benefit the most people.

Gregerson said that after her first one-year term, “almost everything I did was working across the aisle – there is no way you are going to get four bills through with the environment we had last year without working across the aisle…”

Burrage brought up the state gasoline tax, suggesting some possible changes because that tax does not increase with inflation, only on the number of miles driven, “so that every few years, the Legislature looks at raising the gas tax.”

Instead, she suggested looking at a different way to collect money from driver, perhaps a sales tax on fuels. That approach, however, would require a state constitutional amendment, “but I think that would make the gas tax more stable.”

She said she has heard that there is a proposal by a Democrat member of the Legislature “so I would be happy to work with them on that.”

WLB Real Estate Sponsor Berkshire Hathaway Home Services Northwest’s Open House – set for this Sunday, Oct. 5 – is a move-in-ready 3-bedroom home in Des Moines!

This home features a nice kitchen with additional eating space, fresh paint inside and out, a finished daylight basement office/bedroom, utility room, rec room, family room and fireplace.

And it’s all within walking distance to an elementary school and transit in a great neighborhood!

Here are some pics (click images to see larger versions/slideshow):

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Here are the details:

WHAT: Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Northwest Open House

WHEN: Sunday, Oct. 5 from 12:30 – 3:30 p.m.

WHERE: 908 S 202nd Street, Des Moines, WA 98198

INFO:

  • List Price: $289,950
  • MLS Number: 695934
  • Bedrooms: 3
  • Bathrooms: 1.5
  • Year Built: 1958
  • Approximate House SqFt: 1,820
  • Approximate Lot SqFt: 8,750

Site Features:

  • Cabana/Gazebo
  • Cable TV
  • Deck
  • Fenced-Fully
  • Gas Available
  • High Speed Internet
  • RV Parking
  • Shop

Marketing remarks:

This beautiful home is move-in-ready, features a nice kitchen w/additional eating space, 3 bedroom, fresh paint inside and out, finished daylight basement office/bedroom, utility room, rec room, family room & fireplace.

Walking distance to elementary school and transit, great neighborhood.

Click here to see the full, detailed listing.

Click here to view all of Berkshire Hathaway’s Open Houses.

We all know the weather is changing, that fall is in the air, and that winter is fast approaching but – it was nice to bask in the beautiful sunny weather last Saturday!

Did you see the sail boat races right out in front, just spectacular. We still see visitors from out of state and they can’t believe our beautiful location. One lady from Iowa purchased two bottles of wine to take back home.

With the holidays fast approaching it is time to start thinking about warm clothes, parties, and Christmas gifts. So with this in mind, the market wines will be on sale at 20 to 25% off this Saturday, and to give you some incentive, purchase a bottle of wine and you can reach in the pot and draw for an instant door prize. Prizes include logo wear, a framed market poster, coffee mugs, water bottles and more. All proceeds go to the Market Foundation.

Wine Sale Door Prizes Collage 2014

The Des Moines Arts Commission will be manning their booth informing people of their fall and winter events, including the Squid-A-Rama.

Seattle Spice, girls fast pitch softball team will be holding a bake sale. Seattle Spice Softball Club is a 501c3 non-profit organization and offers an outstanding opportunity for any softball player who wants to enhance her softball skills and compete at a higher level.

Food Trucks: Bing of Fire, Stella Fiore Pizza, Nomad Curbside Cuisine

Music: Back by popular demand is the band with a funny name “Flannel Asparagus

There is still time to sign your team up for the 8th Annual Chili Cook-Off.  It is held on the last day of the season (Oct 25th). You can pick up an application at the market information booth or visit our web site and download an application. This year, same as last, the tasters will pick all the winners; First, Second, Third and Best Team Theme will receive prizes.

Upcoming events: The DMAC is hosting a Coffee with Cop on October 13th. On October 31st check out the annual Trick or Treat Path and the Halloween Carnival for kids. The Legacy Foundation’s Bayside Brunch is on November 2nd at Anthony’s Restaurant. The 2nd Annual Squid-A-Rama is on November 8th.

To keep up with all the special events, featuring what’s fresh and entertainment at the market, please log onto the web site and sign up for our e-newsletter that comes out once a week. You can also keep up on the activities by visiting the market’s Facebook page.

[EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is a Letter to the Editor, written by a Reader. It does not necessarily reflect the opinion of The Waterland Blog nor its staff:]

Response to Mr. Schipper’s letter of September 30, 2014.

I am amazed that anyone would think that the “Highline School Board” could possibly be regarded as a good fiscal steward of our tax dollars”

Mr. Schipper’s letter must have been written for him by the Highline School District’s Public Relations Department, because it’s hard to believe that any one could be that naive!

The primary function of the Public Relations Department of the School District Is to hoodwink you into voting for this and other upcoming bonds!

Recently, they budgeted $700,000.00 per year for the Public Relations Department with an annual increase of 16%.

Compounding those increases each year will bring that annual amount to a whopping: One Million, Four Hundred Seventy Thousand, Two Hundred Thirty Nine, Dollars, annually! That will happen in just five short years!

You might wonder how that expenditure will benefit the Students or the Highline School System! It won’t!

Proposition # 1 appears to be an outright theft, in broad daylight, if the low information voters are conned into voting for it.

The Board also, Recently increased the salary of the Secretary to the Board of Directors of the Highline School District, from a whopping $75,000.00 dollars per year to $303,000.00 per year.

Over the life of the bond issue that will amount to NINE MILLION, THREE-HUNDRED NINETY THREE THOUSAND DOLLARS!

I guess the School Board has to do something with the money our taxes provide! Do you believe that qualifies as “Good Fiscal Stewardship”, I don’t, but I guess I must be old fashioned! I used to vote for school bonds to benefit the children but we live in a different world now! Will our children benefit because our School District ends up dividing up all that money among their employees?

For those who have no grasp of what (good stewardship of school funds means.) I guess that will have to do!

But let’s not let it happen this November!

PLEASE VOTE NO ON PROPOSITION #1

AUTHORIZED BY RESOLUTION NO. 06-14

THANK YOU FOR READING THIS MESSAGE,

YOURS, FOR BETTER STEWARDSHIP OF OUR TAX DOLLARS!!

– Don Wasson

[Have an opinion or concern you'd like to share with our Readers? Please send us your Letter to the Editor via email. Include your full name, please remain civil and, pending our review, we'll most likely publish it.]

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Screenshot from the Washington State Department of Health website showing beaches closed due to red tide.

The Washington State Department of Health and Public Health – Seattle & King County High announced Wednesday (Oct. 1) that due to high levels of a marine biotoxin that causes paralytic shellfish poisoning – also known as “red tide” – found in samples collected at the Des Moines Marina, that beaches from Three Tree Point south to the Pierce County line have been closed to recreational shellfish harvesting.

The closure includes clams, oysters, mussels,, geoducks and scallops. Working with partners, Public Health – Seattle & King County is posting advisory signs at beaches warning people to not collect shellfish.

Shrimp and crab are not included in this closure. Crabs should be cleaned prior to cooking, and the white-yellow fat inside the back of the shell, often referred to as “crab butter,” should be discarded. Commercial beaches are sampled separately and commercial products should be safe to eat.

An existing biotoxin closure for butter clams and varnish clams remains in effect for beaches north of Three Tree Point to the Snohomish County line.

Marine biotoxins are not destroyed by cooking or freezing and can be life threatening. People can become ill from eating shellfish contaminated with the naturally occurring marine algae that contain toxins that are harmful to humans. Symptoms of PSP can appear within minutes or hours, are generally mild, and begin with numbness or tingling of the face, arms, and legs. This is followed by headache, dizziness, nausea, and muscle weakness. Some people describe a floating sensation. In cases of severe poisoning, muscle paralysis and breathing difficulty respiratory failure can occur. Anyone experiencing these symptoms after eating shellfish should contact a health care provider immediately. For extreme reactions, call 911.

In most cases, the algae that contains toxins cannot be seen and must be detected using laboratory testing. The Washington State Department of Health and Public Health – Seattle & King County will continue to monitor beaches and will notify the public if the levels of PSP toxin become unsafe in other areas.

Recreational shellfish harvesting can be closed due to rising levels of biotoxin at any time. Therefore, harvesters are advised to call the DOH Biotoxin Hotline at 1-800-562-5632 or visit the Biotoxin website before harvesting shellfish anywhere in Puget Sound.

[EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is a Letter to the Editor, written by a Reader. It does not necessarily reflect the opinion of The B-Town Blog nor its staff:]

Dear Editor,

After voters approved school construction bond measures in 2002 and 2006, Highline Public Schools replaced most of the district’s deteriorating elementaries and Mt. Rainier High with modern safer schools designed for learning in the 21st Century.

Each project came in on time and on budget. The district also leveraged the bond funds to qualify for additional millions of dollars in Port of Seattle, state and federal matching funds to rebuild even more schools.

Additionally, the district saved taxpayers nearly $10 million by refinancing the existing bonds. Now with the economy on the mend, Highline Public Schools is asking the voters in November to approve a school construction bond to replace, renovate, and repair schools.

Log on to the Building for Tomorrow Today section of highlineschools.org to learn more about building conditions at the school proposed to be replaced or renovated. Or better yet, just talk to students, parents or teachers at those schools. They won’t give you a sob story but just tell the truth about the challenges of trying to learn in buildings with failing heating, ventilation, plumbing and electrical systems.

Des Moines Elementary, Highline High, Evergreen and Tyee students deserve to learn in a safer and modern educational environment just as much as students at the schools previously rebuilt or renovated. That is equity.

Highline Public Schools has been a good fiscal steward of our tax dollars.

Vote Yes for the Highline Public Schools bond on the November ballot.

Thank you,
Lois Schipper
Highline Citizens for Schools – Chair

[Have an opinion or concern you'd like to share with our Readers? Please send us your Letter to the Editor via email. Include your full name, please remain civil and, pending our review, we'll most likely publish it.]

Mia Gregerson, left, will debate Jeanette Burrage on Sept. 30.

REMINDER: A forum featuring the two candidates running for State Representative, District 33, Position #2 will be held this Tuesday night, Sept. 30, at 7 p.m.

The debate will take place at the Des Moines Library, located at 21620 11th Avenue South.

Mia Gregerson, the incumbent, will face off against the challenger, Jeanette Burrage.

Gregerson also serves as mayor of SeaTac.

Burrage has served previously in the Legislature, was a King County Superior Court Judge and is currently a Des Moines City Councilmember.

The event is free and open to everyone and anyone, and is sponsored by The Waterland Blog, SeaTac Blog and Normandy Park Blog.

Questions will be taken from the floor, so bring your thinking cap!

by Dave Markwell

Here is a repeat of my only column that I wish was never written…it’s the anniversary of the event that inspired the words that I wish I did not have to write…

“Sir!!!”

My friend died last week. It was a tragedy on a scale not yet invented. Its impact on his family and friends cannot be measured. The value of a single life is often overlooked and taken for granted, until it is gone. Only then do we REALLY know what it meant. It meant everything. Every person means everything. There is nothing more important than a single person.

Each day, death lines the middle pages of newspapers and statistic forms as a tool to inspire readership or funding. The face of death has become faceless. We have become numb to what it really means. Until a late night phone call changes everything after it and a world that once was, will never be again. A lot is made of “just causes” and “higher purposes”, but they are all bullshit to the people left behind to sleeplessly wander the wee-hours, wide-eyed, searching for answers that do not exist. These people know what matters; another day, another moment with the lost one, to embrace, to share a birthday or watch a game. They would pay or trade all that they have for one more moment. These moments cannot, however, be bargained for. They exist for as long as they do and no more. It is just so, for all of us. One never knows when a life that was will no longer be. The phone could ring at any time for anyone, without warning or even a tiny hint.

Death, though, in a peculiar irony, truly shines a light on life. We gain a greater understanding and appreciation of life’s fickle impermanence and the urgency to live it how we want and with whom we love. This is little solace, but it is not nothing. Viewing the world and the people we share it with, with a more loving, less critical, more forgiving eye seems a pretty thin reward for the loss of someone we love. I would not trade for it, but I will take it. This may be a final gift bestowed upon the survivors and we are changed because of it.

Many things live in the eye of grief’s storm. Many are bad things, but not all. Friends and family live here. Stories of a life live here. And, hidden in the swirling, dusty wind and dark clouds, tomorrow lives here. Some weak thread of hope lives even in the most violent swells of despair, this hope is tomorrow. Today will end and tomorrow will come. This is hope. Hope that it will get just a little bit better. Sometimes it does and sometimes it doesn’t, but there is always tomorrow and maybe it could be the one.

Another “benefit” of death is the gathering of family and old friends; the fond remembrance of the days that were, smiles and belly laughs, bad puns and tasteless jokes. Food and wine and perhaps a little Mac cement the remaining relationships forever. A moment shared. We are reminded of the connections we have and of the people we love and that love us. This is a great reminder: People love us as much as we love them. We don’t give this much thought, but we should. As strongly as we love, we are loved by others. This is true and should not be overlooked. We matter very much to those that love us.

It is said that “friendship multiplies joy and divides grief.” I hope this is true, because Brian’s family has a lot of friends. Many people are suffering with them. This loss is a shared one, though a parent’s grief perhaps is without any measure of depth and may possibly be indivisible. I hope this is not true, but think it probably is. Nonetheless, I will pray and hope for some small salve to calm the burning sting and place a weak shroud on the vast hole left by this event. It is all I can do. I wish I could do more. We all do.

Tomorrow will come as it always does, but it is diminished by the passing of a wonderful guy. Brian will be loved and missed forever. The best people always are.

[EDITOR'S NOTE:"Feel Good Friday" is a regular column written by Des Moines resident Dave Markwell, who just published his first book called "A Feel Good Life" (buy it on Amazon here). Dave also extols to all neighbors: "Enjoy where we live. Put your feet on the pavement and truly feel how great it is to live here!" Also, you can "friend" Dave on Facebook here. Or work out with him at his exercise company Waterland CrossFit!]

WLB Real Estate Sponsor Berkshire Hathaway Home Services Northwest’s Open House – set for this Sunday, Sept. 28 – is a quaint Normandy Park home with Lot A Beach Rights!

With a great new price, you will appreciate the details of this home with its beautiful wood-wrapped Pella windows, hardwood floors, fireplace w/wood stove insert, designer colors, large rooms and skylights in both the kitchen and bath.

The kitchen offers lots of storage and room for a bistro table.

Great size master suite.

Mature landscaped yards bring fruit/vegetables to the table & flowers too.

RV parking, fenced backyard & shop!

All this AND Lot A Beach Rights for fun on the Sound, Tennis, pools, & clubhouse.

Here are some pics (click images to see larger versions/slideshow):

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Here are the details:

WHAT: Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Northwest Open House

WHEN: Sunday, Sept. 28 from 1 – 4 p.m.

WHERE: 405 SW 207th Place, Normandy Park, WA 98166

INFO:

  • List Price: $285,000
  • MLS Number: 678324
  • Bedrooms: 2
  • Bathrooms: 1
  • Year Built: 1954
  • Approximate House SqFt: 820
  • Approximate Lot SqFt: 6,200

Site Features:

  • Dble Pane/Strm Windw
  • Dining Room
  • High Tech Cabling
  • Security System
  • Skylights
  • Fenced-Partially
  • Gas Available
  • High Speed Internet
  • Patio
  • RV Parking
  • Shop

Marketing remarks:

Great new price!

You will appreciate the details of this quaint home; beautiful wood wrapped Pella windows, hardwood floors, fireplace w/wood stove insert, designer colors, large rooms and skylights in both the kitchen & bath.

The kitchen offers lots of storage & room for a bistro table.

Great size master.

Mature landscaped yards bring fruit/vegetables to the table & flowers too.

RV parking, fenced backyard & shop! All this AND Lot A Beach Rights for fun on the Sound, Tennis, pools, & clubhouse.

Click here to see the full, detailed listing.

Click here to view all of Berkshire Hathaway’s Open Houses.

Last Saturday the market and the marina made a big welcome to the Tacoma Yacht Club, some 30 boats strong. It took a while for the sun to come out but club members were seen all over the market enjoying shopping and music and visiting with new found friends. This is what the market is about; meeting new and old friends and catching up on what’s been going on in the community and in their lives.

Just in time for the fall/winter season: check out the new Knit Beanies at the logo wear/info booth. All proceeds benefit the market foundation.

Knit Beanies

Back this Sat is the kid’s all-time favorite Highline MaST center with their touchy-feely tanks filled with wild creatures from Puget Sound waters.

Volunteer group Girl Scouts Troup will have a booth celebrating Super Saturday all across King County.

Market sponsor Down & Out Demolition has donated their booth space to the North Hill Elementary WatchDOGS. They will be doing a fundraising event. They will have baked/food goods available for purchase by donation. These donations will allow the WatchDOGS to pay for their events, such as Pizza Nights, Open Gym Nights and Doughnuts with Dads. North Hill Elementary PTSA will be there along with the North Hill Elementary School WatchDOGS Dads!

Also sponsor Judson Park Senior Living will be showcased this Saturday. They are celebrating over 50 years of service to retired seniors in our community. Since 1963, Judson Park has earned a reputation for quality, stability and leadership in the Seattle area. They are always looking at the future of retirement living, so they can anticipate and address the changing expectations of those they serve.

Food Trucks: Bing of Fire, Six Coins Japanese Mobile, and Peasant Food Manifesto

Music this week is Pure Sparks.

There is still time to sign up your team up for the 8th Annual Chili Cook-Off.  It is held on the last day of the season (Oct 25th). You can pick up an application at the market information booth or check our web site and download an application. New teams signing up this week are Marina Fire Chili (our fire department gentlemen), Rob Dogs Chili and the team from our recycling buddies at Recology (they’re still trying to come up with a catchy name).

Upcoming events:

To keep up with all the special events, featuring what’s fresh and entertainment at the market, please log onto the web site and sign up for our e-newsletter that comes out once a week. You can also keep up on the activities by visiting the market’s Facebook page.

From our very own Puget Sound Weather Geek:


Click ^ “Play” ^ to see/hear the live streaming weather report/forecast.

A classic strong pacific storm is churning off the coast of Washington today:

The center of the system will not directly impact us or generate a major wind event. However, the cold front that is attached to it will bring gobs of rain late tonight into early morning Wednesday.

This center of the system will not directly impact us or generate a major wind event. However, the cold front that is attached to it will bring gobs of rain late tonight into early morning Wednesday.

The Puget Sound Wx Geek Live Stream is up and running in storm mode this afternoon, be sure to check it out!

Spaghetti-Night-2014-full-page

Save the date: Friday, Oct. 3 from 5 – 7 p.m. at the Des Moines Activity Center, 2045 S 216th Street in Des Moines!

Enjoy a scrumptious dinner featuring Pasta with Marinara sauce, Meatballs, Salad, Breadsticks and a delicious dessert!

Sponsor Normandy Park Senior Living teams up with Des Moines Activity Center volunteers and staff to kick off the fall with this fundraiser in support of programs and services that enhance the experience of being an older adult.

Ticket prices are $10 for adults, $5 for children age 12 and under, $20 for families and be purchased in advance by calling 206-878-1642 or at the door!

A Candidates’ Forum is set for Monday, Sept. 29, starting at 7 p.m. at the Des Moines United Methodist Church, located at 22225 9th Ave. South.

State Legislative Candidates from the 33rd District being asked to participate are:

  • Senator Karen Keiser and Martin Metz
  • Representative Tina Orwall and Michael Siefkes
  • Representative Mia Gregerson and Jeanette Burrage

Focused discussion issues are:

  • Education
  • Preventing gun violence
  • Hunger issues

The Candidate’s Forum is being co-sponsored by the Des Moines United Methodist Church and The Faith Action Network – an opportunity for citizens to become better educated about our common issues.

Questions?  Contact: Rosalee Mohney at rmohney@comcast.net or 206-870-1456.

by Dave Markwell

I’ve heard it said that the hardest thing to write is a simple, true sentence. I believe this. It is much easier to add words and use literary magic tricks to convey a thought than it is to strip it down to a simple truth. The conservation of words while preserving the integrity of the idea is a skilled art. This is true for words, but also for life.

It is easier to complicate life than it is to simplify it. We subtract by addition in the process of establishing this contrary truth. We add “stuff”. We add more obligations, tasks and goods which only serve to clog the machine. Our schedules, minds and garages are full of this stuff, which makes it difficult to enjoy a clear, simple and true thought or park a car.
Ernest Hemingway addressed his writer’s block by beginning with one true sentence. He believed that if he could write this one sentence, it would breed others. I think he was right. Drawing another parallel between words and life, by stripping away the noise and peeling back the burdensome layers of complicated, but often extraneous clutter, we get closer to where we want to be. We unblock our lives. This is liberating and peaceful and right.

“The more you strive to be sensible and serious and meaningful, the less chance you have of becoming so. The primary objective is to laugh.”- John D. MacDonald’s character, Travis McGee, in the novel, Free Fall In Crimson.

This idea is also liberating. In our quest to be responsible and sensible and reasonable, we lose things. We also diminish our chances of finding the things we are looking for. We search for peace, but manifest our own chaos. It’s a crazy and confounding system.

For most of us, the end of our lives will be a non-event. We will simply slip into the great waters and drift away. Certainly, those close to us will mourn, but most of the world will just keep on keepin’ on. The neighbor’s TV will still turn on and the 7-11 store down the street will still sell slurpees. Not much will have changed by our end.

With this in mind, Travis McGee’s philosophy makes much more sense. Since one day we will simply be gone, today is an important day. It is a day to enjoy and it is a day to remember and embrace a life philosophy in which “the primary objective is to laugh”. The world is less for all of our seriousness. It deserves our joy…we deserve our joy…

[EDITOR'S NOTE:"Feel Good Friday" is a regular column written by Des Moines resident Dave Markwell, who just published his first book called "A Feel Good Life" (buy it on Amazon here). Dave also extols to all neighbors: "Enjoy where we live. Put your feet on the pavement and truly feel how great it is to live here!" Also, you can "friend" Dave on Facebook here. Or work out with him at his exercise company Waterland CrossFit!]